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Why do Bats Tolerate Viruses?

September 9, 2019

Why do Bats Tolerate Viruses?

Bats harbor many viruses, including some that are highly pathogenic in humans and other mammals, but typically asymptomatic in bats. Dan Lu, Kefang Liu, George Gao, William Liu and co-workers reveal the unusual mode of peptide presentation by bat MHC I and the landscape for its recognition by T-cell receptors, shedding light on the role of adaptive immunity in the ability of bats to coexist with viruses.

Image credit: pbio.3000436 & Lin-Fa Wang

EDBC 2019 Alicante (Spain) 23th-26th October

European Developmental Biology Congress

European Developmental Biology Congress

09/12/2019

Research Article

Bone Marrow Helps Pregnancy

Reshef Tal, Hugh Taylor and co-authors show that adult bone marrow–derived progenitor cells make a nonhematopoietic contribution to maternal decidua by differentiating into decidual stromal cells during mouse pregnancy. Their ability to rescue pregnancy loss in mice with decidual stromal cell-specific deficiency shows that these bone marrow–derived mesenchymal progenitors play an important role in establishing and maintaining pregnancy.

Image credit: pbio.3000421

Bone Marrow Helps Pregnancy

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue August 2019

09/06/2019

Methods and Resources

Proteomics of the Vertebrate Heart

Comparison of cardiac proteomes across four vertebrate model systems, by Joel Federspiel, Panna Tandon, Caralynn Wilczewski, Ileana Cristea, Frank Conlon and colleagues, reveals species-specific differentially enriched proteins and pathways, including the Xenopus-enriched Kielin/chordin-like protein (Kcp), which is shown to be important for proper heart development.

Image credit: pbio.3000437

Proteomics of the Vertebrate Heart

09/12/2019

Research Article

Revisiting the Lateral Occipital Complex's Role in Vision

Thomas Decramer, Elsie Premereur, Peter Janssen, Tom Theys and co-authors show that microelectrode recordings in the human lateral occipital complex (LOC) yield highly selective single-unit, multi-unit and high-gamma responses to images of objects; contrary to predictions from fMRI, these data suggest that the LOC occupies an unexpectedly high position in the hierarchy of visual areas.

Image credit: pbio.3000280

Revisiting the Lateral Occipital Complex's Role in Vision

09/12/2019

Research Article

Hippo and the Fibroinflammatory Program

The mechanisms by which epithelial cells orchestrate the intrinsic fibro-inflammatory response and cell proliferation during the repair of injured tissues remains unclear. A study of molecular and cellular changes in pancreatic acinar cells, by Jun Liu, Ming Gao, Pei Wang and co-workers, suggests that the Hippo pathway acts as an intrinsic link to coordinate fibro-inflammatory response and proliferation process in epithelial cells.

Hippo and the Fibroinflammatory Program

Image credit: pbio.3000418

09/12/2019

Research Article

Setting the Speed of Walking

An optogenetic study in mice by Melanie Falgairolle and Michael O’Donovan shows that inhibitory neurons that express engrailed-1 regulate the pattern and frequency of locomotor-like activity in the developing mouse spinal cord.

Setting the Speed of Walking

Image credit: pbio.3000447

09/12/2019

Research Article

Nystagmus Arising in the Retina

Beerend Winkelman, Marcus Howlett, Maj-Britt Hölzel, Maarten Kamermans and co-workers find that involuntary eye movements in cases of congenital stationary night blindness arise from light-induced synchronization of oscillating retinal ganglion cells, revealing that some forms of nystagmus can have a retinal origin, rather than from aberrant interactions between brainstem nuclei and foveal cortical pathways, as commonly thought.

Nystagmus Arising in the Retina

Image credit: pbio.3000174

09/03/2019

Research Article

Notch Mends the Kabuki Syndrome Heart

Zebrafish kmt2d mutants recapitulate the phenotype of human Kabuki Syndrome, have aberrant Notch pathway signaling, and implicate vasculogenesis as a driver of abnormal cardiac development.

Notch Mends the Kabuki Syndrome Heart

Image credit: pbio.3000087

09/03/2019

Research Article

How Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Affects Neurons

The congnitive impairment In Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS)  has yet to be explained, but this study shows that loss of BBS proteins causes synaptic aberrations in principal neurons and can be partially rescued by aerobic exercise.

How Bardet-Biedl Syndrome Affects Neurons

Image credit: pbio.3000414

08/30/2019

Research Article

Organising the ER

Super-resolution microscopy shows that endoplasmic reticulum–shaping proteins regulate not only the macroscale organization of the ER (sheets versus tubules) but also the nanodomain heterogeneity and dynamics of peripheral ER tubules.

Organising the ER

Image credit: pbio.3000355

09/04/2019

Research Article

The Power of the Autapse

Fast autaptic self-inhibition is the major output of parvalbumin-positive basket cells in the neocortex and serves to modulate phase-locking of these interneurons during gamma-oscillations.

The Power of the Autapse

Image credit: pbio.3000419

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