Advertisement
The shape of our ancestors: new insights into the architecture and evolution of early animal cells

April 12, 2019

The shape of our ancestors: new insights into the architecture and evolution of early animal cells

Davis Laundon, Pawel Burkhardt and colleagues used 3D electron microscopy of choanoflagellates and sponge choanocytes to reveal a remarkable variety of cell architecture, suggesting that cell type differentiation may have been present in the stem lineage leading to the animals.

Image credit: Pawel Burkhardt

Celebrate our 15th Anniversary! Tweet @PLOSBiology #PLOSBIO15

PLOS Biology's XV Collection

04/16/2019

Research Article

The ‘cuddle hormone’ blocks alcohol drinking in alcohol-dependent rats

New work from Brendan J. Tunstall, Dean Kirson, Marisa Roberto, Leandro F. Vendruscolo and collaborators demonstrates that administering oxytocin, either systemically, intranasally or intracerebroventricularly, selectively blocks alcohol drinking in alcohol-dependent rats, via a central mechanism that seems to involve dependence-induced alterations in inhibitory neurotransmission in the central amygdala.

Image credit: NIH

The ‘cuddle hormone’ blocks alcohol drinking in alcohol-dependent rats

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue March 2019

04/18/2019

Meta-Research Article

How to share brain scans

Acquiring and sharing large amounts of resting-state fMRI data from multiple imaging sites has recently become critical for bridging the gap between basic neuroscience research and clinical applications. Ayumu Yamashita, Okito Yamashita, and Hiroshi Imamizu and colleagues develop a harmonization method using traveling-subject data to achieve a reduction of between-site differences from a multisite dataset.

Image credit: pbio.3000042

How to share brain scans

04/16/2019

Research Article

The distinct roles of myosins in splitting sperm

Research from Junyan Hu, Shiya Cheng, Xiaochen Wang and colleagues shows that in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans residual body formation and cytoplasm segregation are executed by the coordinated activity of myosin II and myosin VI, and spermatids are detached via myosin VI-mediated cytokinesis.

Image credit: Xiaochen Wang

The distinct roles of myosins in splitting sperm

04/19/2019

Essay

What stops animal viruses from making the jump into humans?

Virologists and epidemiologists view the emergence of new viral diseases in very different ways; this Essay by Cody Warren and Sara Sawyer describes two virologists' view of how animal viruses come to infect humans.

What stops animal viruses from making the jump into humans?

Image credit: National World War I Museum and Memorial, Kansas City

04/12/2019

Research Article

Mother-baby cross-talk at the earliest stages of pregnancy

Fernando H. Biase, Olivier Sandra and colleagues performed an integrative analysis of interactions between conceptus and endometrium, in cattle, revealing complex regulatory networks operating at the time of implantation, highlighting the unique transcriptional blueprint of conceptus-maternal communication.

Mother-baby cross-talk at the earliest stages of pregnancy

Image credit: pbio.3000046

04/09/2019

Research Article

Leaves vs Petals: Mutation Rate Variation in Plants

Long Wang et al., find that the rates of accumulation of mutations vary between different parts of a plant, with lower rates when mutations have greater potential longevity (such as in leaves) than in short-lived structures (such as petals).

Leaves vs Petals: Mutation Rate Variation in Plants

Image credit: Flickr user jeffreyww

04/05/2019

Research Article

Targeting Telomerase

Wilnelly Hernandez-Sanchez, Derek Taylor and co-workers describe the characterization of an artificial nucleoside analogue (5-MeCITP) that potently and selectively inhibits telomerase activity by binding to a unique pocket on the enzyme.

Targeting Telomerase

Image credit: pbio.3000204

04/08/2019

Research Article

Tap... Tap... Tap... Driving the Tempo of Rhythmic Tapping

Jorge Gámez, Hugo Merchant and colleagues show that beat-based timing depends on the amplitude of periodic neural population dynamics and on the number of engaged neurons in primate medial premotor areas.

Tap... Tap... Tap... Driving the Tempo of Rhythmic Tapping

Image credit: pbio.3000054

Get new content from PLOS Biology in your inbox

Thank you! You have successfully subscribed to the PLOS Biology newsletter.

Sorry, an error occurred while sending your subscription. Please try again later.

Try again