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How Brain and Spinal Cord Communicate

July 2, 2020

How Brain and Spinal Cord Communicate

Shahabeddin Vahdat, Ali Khatibi, Julien Doyon and co-authors reveal insights into the functional organization of resting-state networks in the brain and spinal cord, such as the contralateral correspondence between the two halves and segregation of sensory vs motor pathways.

Image credit: pbio.3000789

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06/30/2020

Research Article

Glucose's Paradoxical Activation of AMPK in Cancer

María Gutiérrez-Salmerón, José Manuel García-Martínez, Ana Chocarro-Calvo, Custodia García-Jiménez and colleagues show that metabolic context determines whether the key energy sensor AMPK is a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter. This paradoxical behavior is explained through glucose inhibition of AMPK in healthy tissue versus glucose induction of AMPK in colon cancer epithelial cells.

Image credit: pbio.3000732

Glucose's Paradoxical Activation of AMPK in Cancer

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue June 2020

06/29/2020

Research Article

Holding Unattended Thoughts

How do we represent items held at different levels of priority in visual working memory (“prioritized” vs “unprioritized”)? Qing Yu, Chunyue Teng, and Bradley Postle provide evidence that a common remapping operation may be engaged (selectively in the regions primarily responsible for representing feature-level information) when information held in working memory is outside the focus of attention.


Image credit: Wikimedia Commons user Murgatroyd49

Holding Unattended Thoughts

06/25/2020

Research Article

Mapping Insecticide-Resistant Mosquitoes

Penelope Hancock, Catherine Moyes and co-workers provide fine-resolution maps of insecticide resistance levels in malaria vectors for large parts of Sub-Saharan Africa; these quantify recent spatial trends and can inform implementation of management practices.

Image credit: pbio.3000633

Mapping Insecticide-Resistant Mosquitoes

06/25/2020

Research Article

NCX1 and Sodium Sensing in Macrophages

Inflammation and infection can trigger local tissue accumulation of Na+ ions, boosting pro-inflammatory antimicrobial activity of monocyte/macrophage-like cells. Patrick Neubert, Arne Homann, David Wendelborn, Jonathan Jantsch and colleagues show that the sensing of Na+ ions by macrophages requires the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger NCX1.

NCX1 and Sodium Sensing in Macrophages

Image credit: pbio.3000722

06/19/2020

Research Article

Extruding Bacterial Amyloids

Curli are functional amyloids that play critical roles in biofilm formation and adhesion in many Enterobacteriaceae. Two outer membrane proteins, CsgG and CsgF, form the core apparatus for secretion and assembly of the curli structural subunits. The cryo-EM structure of the CsgG-CsgF complex, by Manfeng Zhang, Huigang Shi, Xuemei Zhang, Xinzheng Zhang and Yihua Huang, reveals a unique amyloid secretion channel with two tandem constriction regions.

Extruding Bacterial Amyloids

Image credit: pbio.3000748

06/19/2020

Research Article

Dopamine Modulates Response to Surprising Sounds

Information about unexpected stimuli is encoded in the form of prediction error signals. The earliest prediction error signals identified in the auditory brain emerge subcortically in the inferior colliculus. Catalina Valdés-Baizabal, Guillermo Carbajal, David Pérez-González and Manuel Malmierca reveal the essential role of dopamine in encoding the precision of prediction errors at the auditory midbrain.

Dopamine Modulates Response to Surprising Sounds

Image credit: pbio.3000744

06/18/2020

Short Reports

Centriolar Satellites and the Cilium

Redistributing centriolar satellites to the periphery or center of the cell reveals novel functions for satellites during mitosis, cilium maintenance, and cilium disassembly, suggesting novel mechanisms.

Centriolar Satellites and the Cilium

Image credit: pbio.3000679

06/12/2020

Short Report & PRIMER

Thinking of Others...

Why do we like seeing good things happen to others? A study of rhesus monkeys playing a juice donation game shows that the anterior cingulate cortex is necessary for monkeys to acquire normal prosocial preferences. Also read the accompanying Primer.

Thinking of Others...

Image credit: pbio.3000735

06/10/2020

Methods and Resources

How Mitochondria Drive Trypanosome Development

Developmental progression of Trypanosoma brucei is accompanied by metabolic remodeling of its mitochondrion, increasing levels of ROS, which act as essential signals to drive differentiation.

How Mitochondria Drive Trypanosome Development

Image credit: pbio.3000741

06/10/2020

Research Article

Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages and the UPR

Tumor-infiltrating macrophages have an active UPR and a mixed proinflammatory and immune-suppressive phenotype. This is driven by the IRE1a/Xbp1 axis of the UPR, so targeting the UPR may increase the response to immune checkpoint blockade therapy.

Tumor-Infiltrating Macrophages and the UPR

Image credit: Flickr user NIAID

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