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Back-Packing Bat-Tracking

April 2, 2020

Back-Packing Bat-Tracking

Simon Ripperger, Frieder Mayer and co-authors present a wireless biologging network that enables simultaneous direct proximity sensing, high-resolution tracking, and long-range remote data download at tag weights of only one to two grams.

Image credit: Sherry and Brock Fenton

PLOS Biologue

Community blog for PLOS Biology, PLOS Genetics and PLOS Computational Biology

PLOS Biologue

04/03/2020

Essay

Missing Metagenomes

Have you ever tried to use metagenomic DNA sequences reported in scientific publications? Were you successful? Ester Eckert, Andrea Di Cesare, Diego Fontaneto, Gianluca Corno and colleagues reveal that every fifth published metagenome is not available to science, and ask whether data accessibility should be considered a mandatory component of manuscript submission.


Image credit: Wikimedia Commons user D. Hardisty

Missing Metagenomes

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue March 2020

04/03/2020

Methods and Resources

BigBrain 3D Atlas of Cortical Layers

Using deep learning to segment the layers of the cerebral cortex, Konrad Wagstyl, Alan Evans and co-workers present the first whole brain quantitative atlas of cortical and laminar structure. This laminar atlas provides a novel framework for bridging between the scales of neuroscience.

Image credit: Konrad Wagstyl

BigBrain 3D Atlas of Cortical Layers

04/03/2020

Research Article

Putting Names to Faces

How does our brain put names to faces; by associating spatially separated representations of faces and names or by integrating these representations? Angélique Volfart, Bruno Rossion and co-authors identify populations of neurons in the left human anterior temporal lobe that fire only on the integration of identity information from faces and names.

Image credit: pbio.3000659

Putting Names to Faces

04/01/2020

Essay

Towards a Better Explanation of Cancer

Carlos Sonnenschein and Ana Soto propose that a new theory of cancer — the “tissue organization field” theory — explains phenomena (such as the normalization of cancer cells) that are not consistent with the widely held somatic mutation theory.


Towards a Better Explanation of Cancer

Image credit: Wikipedia Commons by Johannes Hevelius

03/31/2020

Editorial

The Future of PLOS Biology

 Established over 15 years ago, PLOS Biology pioneered open access publishing in the Life Sciences at a time when most of the literature remained locked behind paywalls. In this Editorial, Nonia Pariente, on behalf of the PLOS Biology Staff Editors, looks to the future, as we reinvigorate our mission to act as a catalyst for open science and accelerate change in scientific communication for the benefit of science and scientists.


The Future of PLOS Biology

Image credit: pbio.3000707

03/31/2020

Research Article

Dynamics of the Norovirus Capsid

High-resolution cryo-EM, by Joseph Snowden, Morgan Herod, Nicola Stonehouse and co-authors, reveals that the norovirus capsid continuously samples conformational space, challenging the model of conformational changes in virus structure being orchestrated along linear, irreversible pathways of assembly and disassembly, with implications for infectivity and immune evasion.

Dynamics of the Norovirus Capsid

Image credit: pbio.3000649

03/30/2020

Methods and Resources

Compact CRISPR

A small ortholog of Cas9 isolated from Staphylococcus auricularis recognizes a simple 5'-NNGG-3' PAM, displays high activity for genome editing and is compact enough to be packaged into adeno-associated virus.

Compact CRISPR

Image credit: pbio.3000686

03/30/2020

Essay

Vocal Learning: Beyond the Continuum

Vocal learning is the capacity to modify vocal output on the basis of experience. Pedro Tiago Martins & Cedric Boeckx maintain that the existing evidence supports a more nuanced view of this phenotype.

Vocal Learning: Beyond the Continuum

Image credit: Flickr user Dennis Flax

03/30/2020

Community Page

Youth Science Workshops

A novel science education outreach event in which grad students communicate their research to young students. This benefits all the participants, increasing science interest of the audience and improving science communication skills of the grad student presenters.


Youth Science Workshops

Image credit: pbio.3000668

03/27/2020

Perspective

What is Replication?

Brian Nosek and Timothy Errington propose that the answer shifts the conception of replication from a boring, uncreative, housekeeping activity to an exciting, generative, vital contributor to research progress.

What is Replication?

Image credit: pbio.3000691

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