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Flies' Innate Sense for CO2

January 17, 2019

Flies' Innate Sense for CO2

In the fruit fly, olfactory associations are formed in the mushroom body, while the lateral horn is thought to process innate olfactory responses. Nélia Varela, Miguel Gaspar, Sophie Dias and Maria Luísa Vasconcelos use a behavioral screen in fruit flies to reveal neurons in the lateral horn that are selectively involved in the innate aversive response to carbon dioxide.

Image credit: pbio.2006749

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PLOS Biology's XV Collection

01/17/2019

Research Article

Regulating the Burning of Fat

Wenxin Song, Qi Luo, Kathleen Giacomini, Ligong Chen and co-workers find that white adipocytes use the organic cation transporter Oct3 for the uptake and subsequent degradation of norepinephrine, a major regulator of thermogenesis; Oct3-deficient mice show increased browning of white fat, dependent on adrenergic signaling.

Image credit: pbio.2006571

Regulating the Burning of Fat

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Current Issue December 2018

01/16/2019

Research Article

Informing HIV Vaccine Designe

Branislav Ivan, Zhaozhi Sun, Harini Subbaraman, Nikolas Friedrich and Alexandra Trkola use comprehensive mapping of conformational stages adopted by the HIV‐1 envelope glycoprotein trimer during entry into the cell to reveal the preference of broadly neutralizing antibodies for distinct pre-fusion states of the trimer.

Image credit: RCSB PDB

Informing HIV Vaccine Designe

01/15/2019

Perspective

Large Carnivores under Assault in Alaska

William Ripple, Sterling Miller, John Schoen, and Sanford Rabinowitch argue that current large carnivore management in Alaska is a reversion to short-sighted and discredited concepts of the past, and occurs without monitoring programs designed to scientifically evaluate the impacts on predator populations.

Image credit: J.W. Schoen

Large Carnivores under Assault in Alaska

01/14/2019

RESEARCH ARTICLE

How Do Your Brown Algae Grow?

A combination of experimentation and biophysical modeling, by Hervé Rabillé, Bernard Billoud, Bénédicte Charrier and colleagues, shows that tip growth in the brown alga Ectocarpus relies on a gradient of cell wall thickness, and not on a gradient of cell wall mechanical properties.

How Do Your Brown Algae Grow?

Image credit: Pierre-Louis Crouan & Hippolyte-Marie Crouan

01/15/2019

Methods & Resources

Gene Functions for Salmonella 

Rocío Canals, Jay Hinton and co-workers use comparative transcriptomic analysis of two contrasting Salmonella enterica Typhimurium isolates across 16 in vitro conditions and within macrophages to reveal the mechanism of African Salmonella metabolic defect and a novel bacterial plasmid maintenance system.

Gene Functions for Salmonella 

Image credit: NIAID

01/11/2019

essay

Sleeping Sickness and the Skin

African sleeping sickness is an important disease of sub-Saharan Africa that is approaching elimination, Paul Capewell, Bruno Bucheton, Annette MacLeod and co-authors maintain that an overlooked anatomical reservoir — human skin — may impact control efforts.

Sleeping Sickness and the Skin

Image credit: Mark Field

01/08/2019

Research Article

(Dis)Organizing Mosquito Eggshells

An RNAi functional screen of 40 Aedes aegypti genes specific to the mosquito lineage identifies EOF1 as a protein that plays an essential role in mosquito eggshell formation and melanization.

(Dis)Organizing Mosquito Eggshells

Image credit: James Gathany, Wikimedia

01/10/2019

research article

Sex Pheromones Deceive Cannibals

Maternal sex pheromones in the wax layer of the fruit fly eggshell prevent the egg from leaking, and conceal it from predation by same-species larvae in an anti-cannibalistic strategy that may operate through chemical deception.

Sex Pheromones Deceive Cannibals

Image credit: Roshan Vijendravarma

01/07/2019

Research Article

Coupling Dynein to Diverse Cargoes

A highly conserved mechanism links the microtubule minus end–directed motor dynein to structurally diverse cargo adaptors through its light intermediate chain; this interaction is crucial for dynein function in vivo.

Coupling Dynein to Diverse Cargoes

Image credit: pbio.3000100

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