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Corin makes sweat salty

February 16, 2021

Corin makes sweat salty

Sweating is a basic skin function in body temperature control, and salt excretion and reabsorption in sweat glands are essential for salt-water balance. Meiling He, Ningzheng Dong, Qingyu Wu and colleagues identify corin, a transmembrane protease that activates atrial natriuretic peptide, as a key enzyme in regulating salt excretion in the skin.

Image credit: pbio.3001090

PLOS Biologue

Community blog for PLOS Biology, PLOS Genetics and PLOS Computational Biology.

PLOS BIOLOGUE

02/19/2021

Research Article

Rules for assembling a microbiome

Humans and many other hosts establish a diverse community of beneficial microbes anew each generation, but what determines the success of the assembly process remains poorly understood. Katharine Coyte, Kevin Foster and colleagues develop ecological theory that reveals the rules underlying the assembly of such host-associated microbiota.

Image credit: pbio.3001116

Rules for assembling a microbiome

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue January 2021

02/18/2021

Research Article

Navigating the rhizosphere

Ricardo Machado, Matthias Erb and co-authors show how an important agricultural pest, the western corn rootworm, integrates nutrients (sugars) and plant defense compounds (benzoxazinoids) to navigate the maize rhizosphere and feed on the most nutritious roots.

Image credit: pbio.3001114

Navigating the rhizosphere

02/17/2021

Research Article

Hyperactive platelets in COVID-19

Why is SARS-CoV-2 infection associated with an increased thrombotic risk? Shane Comer, Sarah Cullivan, Paulina Szklanna, Luisa Weiss, Fionnuala Ní Áinle, Barry Kevane, Patricia Maguire and colleagues reveal that disease severity is associated with increased mean platelet volume and decreased platelet:neutrophil ratio; moreover, all COVID-19 patients possess hyperactive circulating platelets, with agonist-induced ADP release 30-to-90-fold higher than controls.

Image credit: David Goodsell

Hyperactive platelets in COVID-19

02/17/2021

Research Article

Nonsense-mediated decay controls herpesvirus latency

Michiel van Gent, Michaela Gack and co-workers identify a novel role for a conserved RNA degradation pathway, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), in suppressing reactivation of the human oncogenic herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, by regulating the abundance of viral polycistronic transactivator transcripts.

Nonsense-mediated decay controls herpesvirus latency

Image credit: pbio.3001097

02/02/2021

Research Article

miRNA paralogues in plant development... Pt I

Heng Lian, Jia-Wei Wang and co-authors use CRISPR-Cas9 technology to investigate the functions of all five miR172 genes in Arabidopsis, finding that miR172 family members exhibit distinct expression pattern and exert functional specificity in regulating meristem size, trichome initiation, stem elongation, shoot branching and floral competence. Also read the accompanying Primer by Bailong Zhang and Xuemei Chen.

miRNA paralogues in plant development... Pt I

Image credit: pbio.3001044

02/02/2021

Research Article

miRNA paralogues in plant development... Pt II

Diarmuid Ó’Maoiléidigh, George Coupland and colleagues show that three genes encoding miR172 act redundantly at the shoot apex to reduce expression of the transcription factor APETALA2, a repressor of flowering. Dual repression of APETALA2 by FRUITFULL and by miR172 enables rapid and stable transition to the reproductive state. Also read the accompanying Primer by Bailong Zhang and Xuemei Chen.

miRNA paralogues in plant development... Pt II

Image credit: Diarmuid O’Maoileidigh

02/01/2021

Research Article

Getting ready for T cell expansion

Levels of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cul4b increase following T cell activation; once expressed, Cul4b helps to maintain DNA integrity in CD4+ T lymphocytes by aiding the repair of replication-induced DNA damage.

Getting ready for T cell expansion

Image credit: Asif Dar & Paula Oliver

01/28/2021

Essay

Anti-science kills

Drawing parallels with Lysenkoism, Peter Hotez argues that COVID-19 has exposed how a rising tide of anti-science rhetoric and activities can dramatically exploit society's vulnerabilities to an infectious disease, suggesting that anti-science extremism has become as big a threat as the virus itself.

Anti-science kills

Image credit: pbio.3001068

01/28/2021

Research Article

Explaining geographical patterns of Lyme disease

Lyme disease is common in the northeastern US, but rare in the southeast. This study shows that this is largely because the tick vectors attach abundantly to rodents (good hosts for the Lyme bacteria) in the north, and to lizards (poor hosts) in the south.

Explaining geographical patterns of Lyme disease

Image credit: pbio.3001066

01/26/2021

Short Reports

I'd like to say a few words...

Speakers prepare sentence structures in different ways and rely on alpha and theta oscillations differently when planning sentences with and without agent case marking, challenging theories on how production and comprehension affect language evolution.

I'd like to say a few words...

Image credit: pbio.3001038

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