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Starving Bacteria Drop their Tails and Plug the Holes

March 19, 2019

Starving Bacteria Drop their Tails and Plug the Holes

Josie Ferreira, Morgan Beeby and co-authors find that when chronically deprived of nutrients, γ-proteobacteria eject their flagella and insert a novel plug into the remains of their flagellar motors, presumably to prevent leakage through the outer membrane.

Image credit: pbio.3000165

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PLOS Biology's XV Collection

03/21/2019

Research Article

The Brain's View of Duration

How does the human brain represent time? A neuroimaging study by Foteini Protopapa, Domenica Bueti and co-authors reveals the existence in the human Supplementary Motor Area of chronotopic maps — neural units tuned to different durations and mapped to contiguous portions of the cortical surface.

Image credit: pbio.3000026

The Brain's View of Duration

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue February 2019

03/21/2019

Research Article

Nailing Kinase Specificity

Chad Miller, Benjamin Turk and colleagues re-engineer the catalytic cleft of protein kinases from the STE20 family to demonstrate that phosphorylation site specificity can be both necessary and sufficient for certain signalling outputs.

Image credit: pbio.2006540

Nailing Kinase Specificity

03/20/2019

Short Reports

Insulin and Reproductive Development

Ablation of insulin receptors in astrocytes, by Iyad Manaserh, Jennifer Hill and co-workers, reveals that insulin promotes pubertal development and fertility in mice by acting on astrocytes rather than directly affecting neuronal reproductive circuits.

Image credit: pbio.3000189

Insulin and Reproductive Development

03/20/2019

Research Article

Warming and Rousing the Body

Fumito Naganuma, Ramalingam Vetrivelan and colleagues show that a neurotensin-producing subset of neurons in the lateral hypothalamus promote arousal and thermogenesis; these neurons are necessary for appropriate sleep-wake and body temperature responses to various stressors.

Warming and Rousing the Body

Image credit: pbio.3000172

03/21/2019

Research Article

Are you a Worker or a Queen?

In honeybees, nutrition drives dimorphic size development of reproductive organs in fertile queens and sterile workers. Annika Roth, Martin Beye and co-workers use the first induced morphological mutants in honeybees to show that this developmental plasticity requires a genetic program that is switched on by the “feminizer” gene.

Are you a Worker or a Queen?

Image credit: pbio.3000171

03/18/2019

Research Article

What is Alternative Transcriptional Initiation for?

The transcription of a gene may start from one of several transcription start sites, a phenomenon known as alternative transcriptional initiation. Contrary to common belief, Chuan Xu, Joong-Ki Park and Jianzhi Zhang show that variation of the transcription start site of a given gene is non-adaptive and is largely attributable to transcriptional initiation error that is typically deleterious.

What is Alternative Transcriptional Initiation for?

Image credit: pbio.3000197

03/18/2019

Essay

Biodiversity Data Integration

This Essay highlights data resolution as central property of biodiversity data that affects the precision of macro-ecological inferences, discussing ways to maximize synergies among data types.

Biodiversity Data Integration

Image credit: pbio.3000183

03/18/2019

RESEARCH ARTICLE

How Reduced Tryptophan Aids Memory

A neurobehavioral study in mice reveals that dietary restriction (and in particular reduced dietary tryptophan) can improve memory performance by reducing serotonin-mediated mTORC1 signaling in the hippocampus. 

How Reduced Tryptophan Aids Memory

Image credit: pbio.2007097

03/12/2019

Research Article

Amorous Planthoppers Twerk to Woo

Planthopper insects produce fast abdominal twerks for vibrational communication through the substrate, employing a novel vibratory organ that uses two reciprocal elastic recoil mechanisms to generate fast cyclical motion.

Amorous Planthoppers Twerk to Woo

Image credit: Flickr user Katja Schulz

03/12/2019

Research Article

Hotspots of Human Impact

A global analysis of human impacts on threatened vertebrates shows that they are almost ubiquitous across Earth, and hundreds of species have no refuge from these impacts.

Hotspots of Human Impact

Image credit: pbio.3000158

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