Advertisement
NRF2, Primary Cilia and Hedgehog

February 13, 2020

NRF2, Primary Cilia and Hedgehog

Pengfei Liu, Donna Zhang and co-authors reveal a novel role for the transcription factor NRF2 in controlling the primary cilium and its associated Hedgehog signaling pathway; they also uncover a mechanism by which NRF2 hyperactivation promotes tumor progression.


Image credit: Pengfei Liu

PLOS Biologue

Community blog for PLOS Biology, PLOS Genetics and PLOS Computational Biology

PLOS Biologue

02/14/2020

perspective

Seaweed Germplasm Banking

Macroalgal germplasm banking is an important resource for biodiversity conservation, human food security, and industry innovation. This Perspective article by Rachael Wade, Filipe Alberto and co-authors maintains that an international, coordinative initiative is needed to fully develop and capitalize on this resource.

Image credit: Flickr user Rich Brooks

Seaweed Germplasm Banking

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue January 2020

02/11/2020

Research Article

Tracking Mumps Outbreaks

Shirlee Wohl, Hayden Metsky, Stephen Schaffner, Paul Rota, Lawrence Madoff, Nathan Yozwiak, Bronwyn MacInnis, Sandra Smole, Yonatan Grad, Pardis Sabeti and co-workers study recent mumps outbreaks in the United States to reveal transmission patterns within and between Massachusetts communities, highlighting the importance of combining detailed genomic and epidemiological data, both locally and nationwide.


Image credit: pbio.3000611

Tracking Mumps Outbreaks

02/10/2020

research article

Light-Sensitive Adipocytes

Brown adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in energy homeostasis and serves as a metabolic sink for glucose and fatty acid. Mari Sato, Tadataka Tsuji, Yu-Hua Tseng and co-workers demonstrate a novel light-sensing mechanism in mice via the photoreceptor Opsin3 that regulates fuel utilization and mitochondrial activity of brown adipocytes.

Image credit: pbio.3000630

Light-Sensitive Adipocytes

02/10/2020

Research Article

How Ebola Virus Enters the Cell

The Ebola virus envelope glycoprotein is a membrane fusion machine required for the virus to enter into host cells. Dibyendu Kumar Das, James Munro and colleagues present direct observation of the conformational changes that the envelope glycoprotein undergoes during the membrane fusion process.

How Ebola Virus Enters the Cell

Image credit: Flickr user NIAID

02/11/2020

Community Page

Improving Biomedical Research 

Daniel Strech, Tracey Weissgerber and Ulrich Dirnagl describe an ongoing large-scale structured initiative at the Berlin Institute of Health which aims at improving the robustness, reproducibility and transparency of research in an academic biomedical setting.

Improving Biomedical Research 

Image credit: pbio.3000576

02/06/2020

Research Article

Selection on Mimicry in Butterflies

Selection scans across multiple populations and species of Heliconius butterfly, by Markus Moest, Steven Van Belleghem, Jennifer James, Chris Jiggins and colleagues, reveal pervasive selection on novel and introgressed color pattern variation. This suggests high rates of color pattern turn-over events, despite strong stabilizing Muellerian mimicry selection and cases of color pattern co-evolution in this radiation.

Selection on Mimicry in Butterflies

Image credit: Chris Jiggins

02/06/2020

Short Reports

Rare Cells Suppress Sensory Responses

Despite their sparsity (about 0.5% of neurons), a population of interneurons in the mouse barrel cortex that express genes associated with both cholinergic and GABAergic signalling can effectively modulate sensory processing in the cortical microcircuit.

Rare Cells Suppress Sensory Responses

Image credit: Amir Dudai & Nadav Yayon

01/27/2020

Methods and resources

"Bellymount" for a See-Through Fly

An innovative imaging platform overcomes the challenge presented by the opacity of the adult Drosophila abdomen, enabling intravital imaging of live, intact flies at whole-organ and sub-cellular scales over multiple days.

"Bellymount" for a See-Through Fly

Image credit: pbio.3000567

01/29/2020

research article

ppGpp, pppGpp and Translation

Alarmones ppGpp and pppGpp reshape the bacterial proteome by acting on DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis. This study shows that inhibition of translation by ppGpp involves prevention of 30S initiation complex formation by ppGpp-bound IF2.

ppGpp, pppGpp and Translation

Image credit: pbio.3000593

01/27/2020

research article

The Basis of Collateral Antibiotic Sensitivity

Collateral sensitivity to antibiotics in bacteria can be explained by a combination of several mechanisms that can be exploited to develop drug switches that combat resistance.

The Basis of Collateral Antibiotic Sensitivity

Image credit: Flickr user NIAID

Get new content from PLOS Biology in your inbox

Thank you! You have successfully subscribed to the PLOS Biology newsletter.

Sorry, an error occurred while sending your subscription. Please try again later.

Try again