Advertisement
Epidemiology of snake envenomation from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

September 8, 2021

Epidemiology of snake envenomation from Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

Karoline Ceron and colleagues find a positive relationship between the size of municipality areas and the number of snake envenomations, indicating that municipalities with larger areas have a mosaic of environments, which may harbor higher richness and abundance of snakes, and can cause more snake encounters with the population.

Image credit: Ceron et al., pntd.0009737

Updates to the PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases Scope

We are excited to share our updated scope. These changes are a reflection of our commitment to engaging in conversations with                      our communities and adapting to center the needs of vulnerable populations afflicted by these poverty-promoting diseases. 

Scope

06/17/2021

Editorial

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases broadens its coverage of envenomings caused by animal bites and stings

To broaden the coverage of a variety of conditions that share the features of currently recognized neglected tropical diseases, PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases will accept manuscripts dealing with snakebite envenoming, scorpion sting envenoming, and envenomings by other animals if the studies deal with epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic, social science, and/or public policy aspects. 

Image credit: Feroze Omardeen, Wikimedia Commons

PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases broadens its coverage of envenomings caused by animal bites and stings

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue September 2021

09/23/2021

Review

Blocking HTLV-1/2 silent transmission in Brazil: Current public health policies and proposal for additional strategies

In this Review, Carolina Rosadas and colleagues find that Brazil is a large country with a well-established healthcare system that is able to assist patients, to provide antenatal care to pregnant women, has an integrative conglomerate of centres for blood donors, and the ability to provide synchronous mass administration of vaccines. 

Image credit: Rosadas et al., pntd.0009717

Blocking HTLV-1/2 silent transmission in Brazil: Current public health policies and proposal for additional strategies

09/09/2021

Research Article

Snakebites in “Invisible Populations”: A cross-sectional survey in riverine populations in the remote western Brazilian Amazon

Guilherme Kemeron Maciel Salazar and colleagues estimate snakebite underreporting and analyze obstacles that prevent victims from obtaining healthcare in the communities located in 15 municipalities on the banks of the Solimões, Juruá and Purus Rivers in the remote Western Brazilian Amazon. 

Snakebites in “Invisible Populations”: A cross-sectional survey in riverine populations in the remote western Brazilian Amazon

Image credit: Maciel Salazar et al., pntd.0009758

Get new content from PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases in your inbox

Thank you! You have successfully subscribed to the PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases newsletter.

Sorry, an error occurred while sending your subscription. Please try again later.

Try again