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Understanding Images

This collection of blog posts and articles showcases the research that created or inspired the journal's monthly                                                  issue image, and explains how the image helps us to understand the research question addressed in the manuscript.

COLLECTION

10/04/2019

Research Article

Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton organizations determine morphogenesis of multicellular trichomes in tomato

In this study, Chang, Xu et al quantitatively analyse morphological traits of trichomes in tomato and perform live imaging of cytoskeletons in stably transformed lines with actin and microtubule markers. The authors show that at different developmental stages, two types of cytoskeletons exhibit distinct patterns in different trichome cells, ranging from transverse, spiral to longitudinal.

Image credit: Chang, Xu and colleagues

Spatiotemporal cytoskeleton organizations determine morphogenesis of multicellular trichomes in tomato

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue September 2019

10/04/2019

Research Article

Manipulating mtDNA in vivo reprograms metabolism via novel response mechanisms

Here Diana Bahhir and colleagues show that inducing mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) stress in Drosophila using a mitochondrially-targeted Type I restriction endonuclease (mtEcoBI) results in unexpected metabolic reprogramming in adult flies, distinct from effects on OXPHOS. The authors find that carbohydrate utilization is repressed, with catabolism shifted towards lipid oxidation, accompanied by elevated serine synthesis. 

Image credit: Diana Bahhir and colleagues

Manipulating mtDNA in vivo reprograms metabolism via novel response mechanisms

10/07/2019

Research Article

Bacillus subtilis PgcA moonlights as a phosphoglucosamine mutase in support of peptidoglycan synthesis

In this study, Patel et al show that PgcA has a significant secondary activity as a phosphoglucosamine mutase (PGNM) and thereby contributes to PG synthesis. These results support a model in which a subset of bacterial phosphoglucomutase (PGM) enzymes function as bifunctional PGM/PNGM enzymes, thereby providing functional redundancy for the essential process of cell wall synthesis.

Image credit: Vaidehi Patel and colleagues

Bacillus subtilis PgcA moonlights as a phosphoglucosamine mutase in support of peptidoglycan synthesis

09/30/2019

Research Article

Ferritin heavy chain protects the developing wing from reactive oxygen species and ferroptosis

Here, Mumbauer et al dissect the function of the cellular iron storage complex, Ferritin, during development of a model organ, the fly wing. Using a genetic approach to uncover the role of both the heavy and light chains of Ferritin, the authors show that targeting the heavy chain consistently produces drastic growth defects in larval discs and adult wings.

Ferritin heavy chain protects the developing wing from reactive oxygen species and ferroptosis

Image credit: Simone Mumbauer and colleagues

09/30/2019

Research Article

Cytoneme-mediated signaling essential for tumorigenesis

The growth of many types of tumors depends on productive interactions with stromal neighbors. In this study, Fereres at al explore the possibility that tumors use cytoneme-mediated signalling to communicate with stromal cells. The authors show that cytoneme-mediated signaling is essential for growth of Drosophila tumors that model human EGFR over-expression and RET-driven disease.

Cytoneme-mediated signaling essential for tumorigenesis

Image credit: Sol Fereres and colleagues

09/19/2019

Review

Xist RNA in action: Past, present, and future

Loda and Heard focus on recent studies characterizing the interaction partners of Xist RNA and discuss how they have affected the field: by addressing long-standing controversies or by giving rise to new research perspectives.

Xist RNA in action: Past, present, and future

Image credit: Loda and Heard

09/12/2019

Topic Page

Origins of DNA replication

In this Topic Page, Babatunde Ekundayo and Franziska Bleichert discuss commonalities and differences in replication origin organization and recognition in the three domains of life. 

Origins of DNA replication

Image credit: Ekundayo and Bleichert

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