Advertisement

Understanding Images

This collection of blog posts and articles showcases the research that created or inspired the journal's monthly                                                  issue image, and explains how the image helps us to understand the research question addressed in the manuscript.

COLLECTION

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue January 2020

01/15/2020

Research Article

RNA Binding Protein FXR1-miR301a-3p axis contributes to p21WAF1 degradation in oral cancer

RNA-binding protein FXR1 is overexpressed in multiple cancers and has previously been shown to be an oncogene in head and neck and lung squamous cell carcinoma. Here, Majumder and Palanisamy show that FXR1 stabilizes miR301a-3p, which in turn targets tumor suppressor p21 and blocks its expression in oral cancer cells. 

Image credit: Majumder and Palanisamy

RNA Binding Protein FXR1-miR301a-3p axis contributes to p21WAF1 degradation in oral cancer

12/27/2019

Research Article

The MITF-SOX10 regulated long non-coding RNA DIRC3 is a melanoma tumour suppressor

A subset of human lncRNAs have been proposed to represent a new class of cancer causing genes. Here, Elizabeth A. Coe et al identify a set of 245 candidate melanoma-associated lncRNAs that are targeted by the MITF and SOX10 melanoma transcription factors. The authors show that DIRC3 may be a clinically important MITF-SOX10 regulated melanoma tumour suppressor that acts to block the spread of the disease.

Image credit: Elizabeth A. Coe and colleagues

The MITF-SOX10 regulated long non-coding RNA DIRC3 is a melanoma tumour suppressor

01/02/2020

Research Article

DNA double strand break repair in Escherichia coli perturbs cell division and chromosome dynamics

In this study, Martin A. White et al perturb the E. coli cell cycle by elevating the frequency of DNA double-strand breaks to determine which parameters of the cell cycle are conserved and which are changed. The authors find that this perturbation does not alter average cell size at initiation of DNA replication or initiation of cell division. 

DNA double strand break repair in Escherichia coli perturbs cell division and chromosome dynamics

Image credit: Martin A. White and colleagues

12/20/2019

Research Article

Common gardens in teosintes reveal the establishment of a syndrome of adaptation to altitude

Fustier, Martínez-Ainsworth and colleagues use a reverse ecology approach to mine the determinants of local adaptation of teosinte populations distributed along two steep altitudinal gradients in Mexico. Their evaluation points to adaptation via an altitudinal multivariate syndrome, in spite of gene flow. 

Common gardens in teosintes reveal the establishment of a syndrome of adaptation to altitude

Image credit: Fustier, Martínez-Ainsworth and colleagues

12/12/2019

Topic Page

Architecture of the Escherichia coli nucleoid

Verma, Qian and Adhya describe how genomic DNA, RNA and proteins are organised to make up the E. coli nucleiod. This piece is also available as a living document on Wikipedia

Architecture of the Escherichia coli nucleoid

Image credit: Subhash C. Verma and colleagues

11/27/2019

Topic Page

Eukaryote hybrid genomes

In this Topic Page, Runemark, Vallejo-Marin and Meier review the evolutionary outcomes of interspecific hybridization and the properties of genomes of hybrid genomes, with a focus on interspecific hybridization

Eukaryote hybrid genomes

Image credit: Anna Runemark and colleagues

11/26/2019

Opinion Piece

The great hairball gambit

Ideker and Flint suggest networks reported to be responsible for psychiatric disease may turn out to be 'hairballs of questionable value', arguing that better network and pathway datasets for complex disorders are needed before robust functional interpretations of GWAS findings can be obtained. 

The great hairball gambit

Image credit: Monicore, Pixabay

11/14/2019

Review

Mouse protein coding diversity: What’s left to discover?

In this review, Lilue et al discuss what is known about the most highly variable regions of the mouse genome, why they are important for human disease modelling, and what is known about their ancestral origins.

Mouse protein coding diversity: What’s left to discover?

Image credit: Jingtao Lilue and colleagues

Get new content from PLOS Genetics in your inbox

Thank you! You have successfully subscribed to the PLOS Genetics newsletter.

Sorry, an error occurred while sending your subscription. Please try again later.

Try again