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05/15/2019

Research Article

HDAC1-mediated repression of the retinoic acid-responsive gene ripply3 promotes second heart field development

Here, Song and colleagues show that zebrafish embryos containing a mutation in a gene called histone deacetylase 1 (hdac1) have smaller hearts with a reduction in the size of the ventricle and outflow tract. The authors find that loss of Hdac1 in zebrafish embryos leads to increased expression of genes that are also induced by excess retinoic acid, a teratogen that induces similar outflow tract defects.

Image credit: Yuntao Charlie Song and colleagues

HDAC1-mediated repression of the retinoic acid-responsive gene ripply3 promotes second heart field development

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue April 2019

05/10/2019

Research Article

Two modes of transvection at the eyes absent gene of Drosophila demonstrate plasticity in transcriptional regulatory interactions in cis and in trans

In this study, Tian et al explore how different regulatory elements contribute to the expression of eyes absent (eya), a gene required for proper eye development in Drosophila. The authors show that eya promoters compete with one another for activation by enhancers, with the promoter that is closest to the enhancers being the favored target for activation.

Image credit: Katherine Tian and colleagues

Two modes of transvection at the eyes absent gene of Drosophila demonstrate plasticity in transcriptional regulatory interactions in cis and in trans

05/15/2019

Research Article

MicroRNA26 attenuates vascular smooth muscle maturation via endothelial BMP signalling

Vascular smooth cells (vSMCs) are a key component of the blood vessel wall and express contractile proteins that help to constrict and relax the vessel. Here, Charlene Watterston and colleagues use a zebrafish model to identify a small microRNA that regulates vascular stabilization. The authors show that microRNA26a is enriched in the endothelial lining of the blood vessel wall and communicates to the smooth muscle cell to control its maturation. 

Image credit: Charlene Watterston and colleagues

MicroRNA26 attenuates vascular smooth muscle maturation via endothelial BMP signalling

05/06/2019

Research Article

Oct1/Pou2f1 is selectively required for colon regeneration and regulates colon malignancy

Here, Vázquez-Arreguín et al use deletion of a conditional Oct1 (Pou2f1) allele in two intestinal stem cell compartments to study gut homeostasis and the effect of Oct1 loss in colon regeneration. The authors find that Oct1 loss is dispensable for maintenance of the mouse gut, but required for recovery after damage to the colon epithelium.

Oct1/Pou2f1 is selectively required for colon regeneration and regulates colon malignancy

Image credit: Karina Vázquez-Arreguín and colleagues

05/09/2019

Research Article

Satellite DNA-containing gigantic introns in a unique gene expression program during Drosophila spermatogenesis

In this study, Fingerhut et al identify a unique gene expression program utilized for the proper expression of genes with intron gigantism, using Drosophila spermatogenic genes as a model system. The authors show that the gigantic introns of these genes are transcribed in line with the exons, likely as a single transcript.

Satellite DNA-containing gigantic introns in a unique gene expression program during Drosophila spermatogenesis

Image credit: Jaclyn M Fingerhut and colleagues

05/15/2019

Editorial

How microbes “jeopardize” the modern synthesis

In this Editorial, Aaron Novick and W. Ford Doolittle summarise a collection of reviews published in PLOS Genetics entitled “How Microbes ‘Jeopardize’ the Modern Synthesis”, which examine how the study of microbial evolution is changing evolutionary theory. 

How microbes “jeopardize” the modern synthesis

Image credit: Gerd Altmann, Pixabay

05/09/2019

Perspective

Taming the giant within

Bateman & Anderson discuss work by Fingerhut et al, who identify a unique gene expression program utilized for the proper expression of genes with intron gigantism, using Drosophila spermatogenic genes as a model system.

Taming the giant within

Image credit: Jack R Bateman & David J Anderson

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