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Current Issue September 2021

08/02/2021

Research Article

Deletion of the SELENOP gene leads to CNS atrophy with cerebellar ataxia in dogs

Christen et al study a hereditary cerebellar ataxia in Belgian Shepherd dogs and find a private homozygous structural variant, a deletion that includes the entire protein coding sequence of SELENOP. Selenium levels in the blood of homozygous mutant puppies were 30% lower, and Selenop-/- knock-out mice developed ataxia but their histopathological changes were less severe than in the investigated dogs.

Image credit: Katrin B., Pixabay

Deletion of the SELENOP gene leads to CNS atrophy with cerebellar ataxia in dogs

08/03/2021

Research Article

OsMADS23 phosphorylated by SAPK9 confers drought and salt tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis in rice

Li et al report a stress-responsive MADS-box transcription factor OsMADS23 from rice conferring osmotic stress tolerance in plants. OsMADS23 activates the transcription of target genes that are key components for ABA and proline biosynthesis, and knockout mutants had lower ABA levels and exhibited higher sensitivity to drought and oxidative stress than wild type.

Image credit: Li et al

OsMADS23 phosphorylated by SAPK9 confers drought and salt tolerance by regulating ABA biosynthesis in rice

08/09/2021

Research Article

How did the guppy Y chromosome evolve?

Charlesworth et al describe evidence that a new Y chromosome evolved recently in the guppy from an X chromosome, replacing the old, degenerated Y, and explaining why the guppy pair still recombine. They suggest that male coloration factors probably arose after the new Y evolved, as they have already evolved expression that is confined to males, a different way to avoid conflict between the sexes.

How did the guppy Y chromosome evolve?

Image credit: còi photograper lê, Pixabay

09/02/2021

Perspective

Rhino breaks the deadlock in Drosophila testis

Molla Herman and Brasset highlight new research by Chen et al (pgen.1009591) on the Rhino-Deadlock-Cutoff complex's essential role in transposon repression in males.

Rhino breaks the deadlock in Drosophila testis

Image credit: Molla Herman and Brasset

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