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03/18/2019

Research Article

Stochastic neural field model of stimulus-dependent variability in cortical neurons

The mechanisms underlying suppression of cortical variability following the onset of a stimulus are of current interest. One candidate mechanism is suppression of noise-induced transitions between multiple attractors, as exemplified by ring attractor networks. Bressloff shows how the tuning of neural variability in ring attractor networks can be analyzed in terms of the stochastic wandering of spontaneously formed tuning curves or bumps in a continuum neural field model.

Image credit: Bressloff, pcbi.1006755.

Stochastic neural field model of stimulus-dependent variability in cortical neurons

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue February 2019

03/18/2019

Research Article

Building a mechanistic mathematical model of hepatitis C virus entry

Hepatitis C virus affects approximately 70 million people worldwide, resulting in a significant impact on human health. Here Kalemera et al. combine experimental approaches with a new mathematical model to study the process of viral entry. Their model is successful in capturing the behaviour of experiments, which show how changes in the amount of the human proteins CD81 and SR-B1 expressed by a cell alter the probability of a virus getting into a cell.

Image credit: Kalemera et al, pcbi.1006905.

Building a mechanistic mathematical model of hepatitis C virus entry

03/20/2019

Research Article

ZnT2 is an electroneutral proton-coupled vesicular antiporter displaying an apparent stoichiometry of two protons per zinc ion

Zinc is a vital trace element crucial for the proper function of some 3,000 cellular proteins. ZnT2 is essential for zinc accumulation in breast milk and is therefore of paramount medical significance. Golan et al. modeled the mechanism of action of ZnT2 and demonstrated both computationally and experimentally, using functional zinc transport assays, that ZnT2 is indeed a proton-coupled zinc antiporter.

Image credit: Golan et al, pcbi.1006882.

ZnT2 is an electroneutral proton-coupled vesicular antiporter displaying an apparent stoichiometry of two protons per zinc ion

03/21/2019

Research Article

Contrasting the effects of adaptation and synaptic filtering on the timescales of dynamics in recurrent networks

Individual neurons are primarily fast devices, yet neurons are also subject to additional biophysical processes, such as adaptive currents or synaptic filtering, that introduce slower dynamics in their activity. Beiran & Ostojic explore the possibility that slow network dynamics arise from such slow biophysical processes.

Contrasting the effects of adaptation and synaptic filtering on the timescales of dynamics in recurrent networks

Image credit: Beiran & Ostojic, pcbi.1006893.

03/20/2019

Methods Article

Identification of pathways associated with chemosensitivity through network embedding

Biological pathways reveal the interactions among genes, providing a complementary way of understanding the drug response variation among individuals. Wang et al. aim to identify pathways that mediate the chemical response of each drug. They show that using the prior knowledge encoded in molecular networks substantially improves pathway identification.

Identification of pathways associated with chemosensitivity through network embedding

Image credit: Wang et al, pcbi.1006864.

03/18/2019

Featured Channel

Complexity

Featuring research from PLOS Computational Biology and PLOS ONE, this Channel brings together all aspects of complexity research and includes interdisciplinary topics from network theory to applications in neuroscience and the social sciences.

Complexity

Image credit: Andy Lamb.

11/26/2009

Featured Issue Image

Motion computation on the fly.

This image shows a hoverfly, Eristalis tenax, face to face with a VLSI vision chip that mimics neurons involved in real-time motion processing.

Motion computation on the fly.

Image credit: David C O'Carroll (The University of Adelaide)

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