Advertisement
Long-Term Persistence of Bi-functionality Contributes to the Robustness of Microbial Life through Exaptation

January 29, 2016

Long-Term Persistence of Bi-functionality Contributes to the Robustness of Microbial Life through Exaptation

The term exaptation describes the process by which a trait that is initially just a by-product of another function may become important in a later evolutionary phase. On the level of enzymes, bi-functionality can contribute to microbial evolution through exaptation. Maximilian Plach and colleagues argue to view bi-functionality not as an evolutionary disadvantage but rather as a contribution to the evolvability of novel functions via exaptation.

Image credit: Maximilian Plach and colleagues

FAQs for Data Policy

Do you have any queries or questions about our data policy?

Take a look here for answers

02/01/2016

research article 

Continuous Influx of Genetic Material from Host to Virus Populations

Clément Gilbert and colleagues report that each time a virus from the Baculoviridae family infects a moth, a large number (dozens to hundreds) and high diversity of moth DNA sequences (86 different sequences) can integrate into replicating viral genomes.

Image credit: Clément Gilbert and colleagues

Continuous Influx of Genetic Material from Host to Virus Populations

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue January 2016

02/01/2016

research article 

A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of peripheral neuropathies with diverse genetic causes. In this study, Young Bin Hong and colleagues identify p.I43N mutation in PMP2 from a family exhibiting autosomal dominant demyelinating CMT neuropathy by whole exome sequencing and characterize the clinical features.

Image credit: Young Bin Hong and colleagues

A Mutation in PMP2 Causes Dominant Demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth Neuropathy

01/21/2016

Viewpoints

Consent Codes: Upholding Standard Data Use Conditions

Stephanie Dyke and colleagues examine the variation in data use conditions that are based on consent provisions for genomics datasets in research and clinical settings.

Consent Codes: Upholding Standard Data Use Conditions

Image credit: Duncan Hull, Flickr, CC BY