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Novel interplay between JNK and Egfr signaling in Drosophila dorsal closure

June 19, 2017

Novel interplay between JNK and Egfr signaling in Drosophila dorsal closure

Image credit: Tatyana Kushnir and colleagues

14th June: PLOS Science Wednesday AMA

Wallberg, Webster, and Hasselmann's AMA on genetic adaptation in high altitude honey bees 

Read the AMA here

06/19/2017

research article

Flipping chromosomes in deep-sea archaea

In this current study, Matteo Cossu and colleagues describe a novel plasmid-encoded archaeal integrase which, in addition to site-specific recombination, can catalyze low sequence specificity recombination reactions akin to homologous recombination. The results and the ubiquitous distribution of pTN3-like integrated elements suggest that a major mechanism of evolution of an entire order of Archaea results from the activity of a selfish mobile genetic element.

Image credit: Matteo Cossu and colleagues

Flipping chromosomes in deep-sea archaea

06/12/2017

Research article

p63 exerts spatio-temporal control of palatal epithelial cell fate to prevent cleft palate

Cleft palate is a serious congenital condition which affects approximately 1 in every 2500 births. Mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor p63 result in cleft palate in humans and mice. In this study, Rose Richardson, Karen Mitchell and colleagues' findings establish the role of p63 in governing the fate of the midline epithelial cells.

p63 exerts spatio-temporal control of palatal epithelial cell fate to prevent cleft palate

Image credit: Rose Richardson, Karen Mitchell and colleagues

06/15/2017

research article

p53 and TAp63 participate in the recombination-dependent pachytene arrest in mouse spermatocytes

Recombination defects during meiosis can lead to formation of aneuploid gametes, one of the major causes of miscarriages and chromosome abnormalities. Marina Marcet-Ortega and colleagues find that p53 and TAp63 are the effectors responsible for activating recombination-dependent arrest in mouse spermatocytes.

p53 and TAp63 participate in the recombination-dependent pachytene arrest in mouse spermatocytes

Image credit: Marina Marcet-Ortega and colleagues

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