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Virulence, pathology, and pathogenesis of Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) in BALB/c mice

December 14, 2017

Virulence, pathology, and pathogenesis of Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) in BALB/c mice

Pteropine orthoreovirus (PRV) is a causative agent of acute respiratory tract infection (RTI) in humans. PRV was isolated from patients and fruit bats in Southeast Asia, and the PRV genome detected in patients with respiratory symptoms, suggesting that PRV causes RTI in humans and that there is potential for PRV to cause RTIs more widely than thought in Southeast Asia. 

Image credit: Rob Sundew

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11/16/2017

VIewpoints

The rise of neglected tropical diseases in "flyover nation"

In this viewpoint, Peter J. Hotez and Sheila Jackson Lee describe how severe poverty, climate changes, human migrations, and changing patterns of global shipping produce a “perfect storm” for ongoing NTD transmission on the Gulf Coast.

Image credit: Stuart Seeger, Flickr

The rise of neglected tropical diseases in "flyover nation"

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue November 2017

12/14/2017

Symposium

Emergence of melioidosis in the Indian Ocean region: Two new cases and a literature review

Melioidosis is a disease caused by bacteria called B. pseudomallei--infections can develop after contact with standing water. It is associated with a high mortality rate (up to 50%) and is endemic in northern Australia and in Southeast Asia. Nevertheless, B. pseudomallei may be endemic in the Indian Ocean region and in Madagascar in particular, so clinicians and microbiologists should consider acute melioidosis as a differential diagnosis in the Indian Ocean region, in particular from Madagascar.

Image credit: Frank Vassen

Emergence of melioidosis in the Indian Ocean region: Two new cases and a literature review

12/14/2017

Review

Drug resistance and treatment failure in leishmaniasis: A 21st century challenge

Chemotherapy is central to the control and management of leishmaniasis. Antimonials remain the primary drugs against different forms of leishmaniasis in several regions. However, resistance to antimony has necessitated the use of alternative medications, especially in the Indian subcontinent. Here, we review the problem of treatment failure in leishmaniasis and the contribution of drug resistance to the problem.

Image credit: Ponte Sucre

Drug resistance and treatment failure in leishmaniasis: A 21st century challenge

12/06/2017

research article

Body size and host blood of T. infestans affect fitness components

Ricardo E. Gürtler and colleagues describe the distributions of insect body length and bloodmeal contents of triatomines over bug stages and habitats in rural villages where Chagas disease is endemic, and link individual bloodmeal contents with female fecundity, host-feeding choices, and body length. Read the Author Summary.

Body size and host blood of T. infestans affect fitness components

Image credit: CDC, Wikimedia Commons

12/01/2017

research article

Pheromone dynamics

By James G. C. Hamilton and colleagues. Read the Author Summary. 

Pheromone dynamics

Image credit: Ray Wilson, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine

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