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New Speaking of Medicine posts from EIC Peter Hotez

“'Vaccine Hesitancy”: The PLOS Currents Collection" and "What Kills Little Kids?"

GO

02/26/2015

Editorial

The Gulf of Mexico: A “Hot Zone” for Neglected Tropical Diseases?

In the case of the US Gulf Coast the term “emerging” should be used with caution since there is

evidence that many of these neglected tropical diseases are not new to the region. Instead, the Gulf

Coast represents one of the poorest regions of the US, and this extreme poverty together with

environmental degradation and a warm subtropical climate are the key factors that allow NTDs to

flourish. 

Image credit: NOAA

The Gulf of Mexico: A “Hot Zone” for Neglected Tropical Diseases?

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue January 2015

02/19/2015

Viewpoints

It’s Time to Dispel the Myth of “Asymptomatic” Schistosomiasis

Asymptomatic schistosomiasis' is a faulty concept promulgated in the 1970s and 1980s. Because of the poor diagnostic sensitivity of standard egg count

diagnostics, many people with light infections were, and still are, mistakenly misclassified as uninfected. It is time to see the disease for what it really is, so that it can be properly controlled.

Image credit: Public Domain

It’s Time to Dispel the Myth of “Asymptomatic” Schistosomiasis

02/23/2015

Research Article

Bartonella spp. in Fruit Bats and Blood-Feeding Ectoparasites in Madagascar

The authors captured, ectoparasite-combed, and blood-sampled cave-roosting Madagascan fruit bats (Eidolon dupreanum) and tree-roosting Madagascan flying foxes (Pteropus rufus) in four single-species roosts within a sympatric geographic foraging range for these species in central Madagascar.

Image credit: Cara E. Brook

Bartonella spp. in Fruit Bats and Blood-Feeding Ectoparasites in Madagascar

02/20/2015

Research Article

High Prevalence of Tropheryma whipplei in Lao Kindergarten Children

Using specific quantitative real-time PCR, followed by genotyping for each positive specimen, the authors estimated the prevalence of T. whipplei in 113 feces from 106 children in Vientiane, the Lao PDR (Laos). T. whipplei was detected in 48% (51/106) of children.

High Prevalence of Tropheryma whipplei in Lao Kindergarten Children

Image credit: Keita et al.