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The "Central Dogma" — 60 Years On

September 19, 2017

The "Central Dogma" — 60 Years On

September 2017 marks the 60th anniversary of one of the most significant lectures in the history of biology. This essay by Matthew Cobb explores the rich content of Francis Crick’s 1957 ‘central dogma’ lecture and its continuing power to help us think about how genes work.

Image credit: pbio.2003243

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PLOS Research News

09/21/2017

research article

Wiring the Female Sexual Brain

A study of rats by Constanze Lenschow, Johanna Sigl-Glöckner and Michael Brechts explores how factors such as sexual experience influence the development of genital cortex and how genital cortex growth affects female sexual maturation.

Image credit: Flickr user Understanding Animal Research

Wiring the Female Sexual Brain

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Current Issue August 2017

09/19/2017

formal comment

What do we talk about when we talk about rhythm?

This Formal Comment by Jonas Obleser, Molly Henry, and Peter Lakatos points out the major challenges that exist for experimental design and neural signal analysis when researchers set out to study deceptively simple human percepts such as ‘rhythm.’ See the related Research Article by Assaf Breska and Leon Deouell, and their response in an accompanying Formal Comment.

Image credit: pbio.2002794

What do we talk about when we talk about rhythm?

09/13/2017

research article

Wish You Were Here: Place Cells Encode Preference

An optogenetic study in rats by Omar Mamad, Marian Tsanov and colleagues shows how the hippocampal place cell network integrates spatial information and context reward value, enabling episodic memory for past experience to support future adaptive behavior.

Image credit: Marian Tsanov

Wish You Were Here: Place Cells Encode Preference

09/11/2017

meta-research article

‘Spin’ in Biomedical Literature

“Spin,” commonly associated with propaganda, is also present in published biomedical research. This systematic review by Kellia Chiu, Quinn Grundy and Lisa Bero shows that the nature of spin varies with study design, with the highest prevalence in clinical trials.

‘Spin’ in Biomedical Literature

Image credit: Flickr user josefstuefer

09/13/2017

research article

Insulin and the Aging Brain

Reduced insulin signaling can improve function and increase lifespan in a number of species. This study by Hrvoje Augustin, Linda Partridge and co-authors, combines imaging, in vivo electrophysiology and cell culture to demonstrate that attenuated insulin signaling has beneficial effects on the functioning of a neuronal circuit in aging Drosophila.

Insulin and the Aging Brain

Image credit: pbio.2001655

09/11/2017

methods and resources

The Extreme Genome Diversity of Blastocystis

A new comparative genome study of Blastocystis, a parasite commonly found in the human gut, by Eleni Gentekaki, Andrew Roger and co-authors, uncovers high levels of differences between Blastocystis subtypes and provides a resource for future investigations.

The Extreme Genome Diversity of Blastocystis

Image credit: pone.0143974

09/11/2017

methods and resources

A Protein-Dynamic Map of the Cell Cycle

A live-cell imaging study maps the dynamics of core cell cycle regulators and reveals unexpected dynamics for several proteins in proliferating versus quiescent cells.

A Protein-Dynamic Map of the Cell Cycle

Image credit: pbio.2003268

09/05/2017

research article

Land vs Ocean: Conservation of Marine Ecosystems

Contrary to conventional wisdom, direct active marine restoration can be the most cost-effective way to maximise the extent of coastal marine ecosystems over decade time-scales.

Land vs Ocean: Conservation of Marine Ecosystems

Image credit: Mark Priest

09/05/2017

research article

Genetics and the Grim Reaper

Large biomedical datasets (UK BioBank, GERA) directly reveals natural selection in contemporary humans, identifying genetic variants with effects on age-specific mortality.

Genetics and the Grim Reaper

Image credit: Jbuzbee via Wikimedia Commons

09/05/2017

methods & resources

From Egg to Chick

Transcription start-site profiling of the chick from freshly laid egg to the moment of hatching reveals dynamic changes in genome-wide promoter usage during avian embryogenesis.

From Egg to Chick

Image credit: Guojun Sheng

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