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The Post-Glacial Peopling of Scandinavia

January 9, 2018

The Post-Glacial Peopling of Scandinavia

A study of ancient DNA from Mesolithic humans by Torsten Günther, Helena Malmström, Emma Svensson, Ayça Omrak, Jan Storå, Anders Götherström, Mattias Jakobsson and co-workers reveals how hunter-gatherer populations colonized Scandinavia in two waves and via two different routes after the last glacial period. 

Image credit: Beate Kjørslevik

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PLOS Research News

01/09/2018

research article

Climate Change, Cyanobacterial Proliferation and Food Web Collapse

Hadayet Ullah, Ivan Nagelkerken, Silvan Goldenberg and Damien Fordham use a combined experimental and modelling approach to show how climate change can alter the flow and transfer efficiency of energy, leading to a collapse at the base of benthic food webs.

Image credit: Lance Anderson

Climate Change, Cyanobacterial Proliferation and Food Web Collapse

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Current Issue December 2017

01/11/2018

short report

Genome Downsizing and World Domination

Kevin Simonin and Adam Roddy find that genome downsizing during the Cretaceous can explain how flowering plants outcompeted the ferns and gymnosperms that had previously dominated terrestrial ecosystems, by enabling them to construct smaller cells.

Image credit: Flickr user alightbourne

Genome Downsizing and World Domination

01/10/2018

research article

Hitting Bacterial Urease via its Metallochaperone

Xinming Yang, Hongyan Li, Hongzhe Sun and colleagues show that a clinically-used bismuth-based drug inhibits the activity of bacterial urease indirectly by targeting its metallochaperone UreG; such a strategy could have broad implications for the development of metalloenzyme inhibitors.

Image credit: pbio.2003887

Hitting Bacterial Urease via its Metallochaperone

01/11/2018

research article 

Fezzik Gave Flies their Out-of-Africa Moment

Amanda Glaser-Schmitt and John Parsch show that regulatory polymorphism in the Drosophila melanogaster gene fezzik plays a role in the natural variation of larval growth and adult body and wing size, and underwent selection as the species expanded out of Africa.

Fezzik Gave Flies their Out-of-Africa Moment

Image credit: Flickr user: Amante Darmanin

01/05/2018

short reports

When an Alga's Eyes are Bigger than its Belly

Electron microscopy of the ubiquitous oceanic picoeukaryotic alga Braarudosphaera bigelowii by Nina Kamennaya, Mikhail Zubkov and colleagues shows that these 1.3-µm organisms can perform remarkable incomplete ingestion of the similar-sized (0.8-µm) cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus, a process the authors call "pomacytosis."

When an Alga's Eyes are Bigger than its Belly

Image credit: Nina Kamennaya & Mikhail Zubkov

01/04/2018

research article

Neurotransmitters Direct Neuronal Migration in the Fish Cerebellum

A combination of optogenetics, calcium imaging and drug screening by Ulrike Theisen, Reinhard Köster and colleagues identifies three neurotransmitter systems that act successively and coordinately on migrating hindbrain neurons in the developing zebrafish

Neurotransmitters Direct Neuronal Migration in the Fish Cerebellum

Image credit: Flickr user NICHD

01/02/2018

methods and resources

A Nematode Chemoreceptor Atlas

A molecular map of nearly 250 nematode chemoreceptors provides an entry point for functional studies and offers markers for studying neuronal patterning and plasticity.

A Nematode Chemoreceptor Atlas

Image credit: pbio.2004218

12/29/2017

research article

Calmodulin Fishing with a Disordered Bait

Binding of calmodulin to the CyaA toxin of Bordetella pertussis induces a structural disorder-to-order transition within its catalytic domain, ensuring that the toxin is only ever active in target eukaryotic cells.

Calmodulin Fishing with a Disordered Bait

Image credit: pbio.2004486

01/12/2018

THE XV Collection

Watching a Vesicle Form

In the first of a series of 12 blog posts, Sandra Schmid discusses her favorite PLOS Biology paper: "This seminal paper represents a significant leap in our understanding of vesicle trafficking." Read the paper itself here.

Watching a Vesicle Form

Image credit: John Heuser

01/12/2018

THE XV Collection

15 Years of Open Science

To mark our 15th birthday, this Collection will showcase 12 monthly blog posts, where our Ed Board Members (starting with Sandra Schmid) pick their favorite articles. For more, read this blog post by Lauren Richardson.

15 Years of Open Science

Image credit: Maxipixel

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