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How Bacteria Help Bees Digest Pollen

December 12, 2017

How Bacteria Help Bees Digest Pollen

In vivo experiments with honey bees and untargeted metabolomic analyses by Lucie Kešnerová, Ruben Mars, Philipp Engel and co-workers identify the metabolic functions of the honey bee gut microbiota and its individual community members, including the digestion of recalcitrant products from dietary pollen.

Image credit: Antonio Mucciolo

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12/14/2017

meta-research article

Non-Technical Summary Data to Inform 3R Strategies

The European Union mandates the publication of non-technical summaries for every project involving animal experimentation. This Meta-Research Article by Bettina Bert, Gilbert Schoenfelder and colleagues uses analysis of more than 5,000 such summaries to reveal future trends in biomedical in vivo research.

Image credit: Understanding Animal Research, Flickr

Non-Technical Summary Data to Inform 3R Strategies

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Current Issue November 2017

12/12/2017

perspective

Science is International; Why aren't Editors?

Editorial board members help shape the trajectory of knowledge in their discipline. This Perspective article by Johanna Espin, Emilio Bruna and colleagues surveyed 30 years of board membership for 24 biology journals and found that editors based outside the Global North were extremely rare.

Image credit: Geralt, Pixabay

Science is International; Why aren't Editors?

12/13/2017

research article

Surviving the Famine, Preparing for Feast

Yonat Gurvich, Dena Leshkowitz and Naama Barkai find that the phosphate starvation program, which is activated in budding yeast in response to phosphate depletion, promotes not only growth in limited phosphate but also recovery when phosphate is replenished.

Image credit: pbio.2002039

Surviving the Famine, Preparing for Feast

12/14/2017

research article

Cell-to-Cell Variation in Stressed-Out Yeast

Audrey Gasch, Feiqiao Brian Yu, Megan McClean and co-authors use single-cell RNA sequencing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reveal cell-to-cell heterogeneity in the transcriptomic response to environmental stress.

Cell-to-Cell Variation in Stressed-Out Yeast

Image credit: pbio.2004050

12/04/2017

research article

Slam Protein Localizes its own mRNA

Shuling Yan, Jörg Großhans and co-workers find that during the cellularization process in Drosophila, slam mRNA and Slam protein form a complex and colocalize at the basal domain of the developing epithelium; this interaction enables the spatiotemporal control of translation.

Slam Protein Localizes its own mRNA

Image credit: Dr. Shuling Yan

12/07/2017

research article

The Circadian Clock, the Cell Cycle and Cancer

A combined computational and experimental study by Rukeia El-Athman, Nikolai Genov, Jeannine Mazuch, Angela Relógio and colleagues highlights the role of the circadian clock as a tumour suppressor, and identifies Ink4a/Arf as a mediator of RAS-induced clock dysregulation that affects cell cycle decisions.

The Circadian Clock, the Cell Cycle and Cancer

Image credit: Pixabay

12/04/2017

research article

Task-Relevance and Sensory Prediction

Model-based analysis of neural data reveals correlates of predictions and prediction errors; both of these were modulated by their relevance to the task in hand.

Task-Relevance and Sensory Prediction

Image credit: Pixabay

11/28/2017

research article

Systemic Resilience Of The Great Barrier Reef

Australia’s Great Barrier Reef has a network of around 100 coral reefs that are ideally suited to promoting the recovery of the ecosystem after major coral bleaching events.

Systemic Resilience Of The Great Barrier Reef

Image credit: Peter J Mumby

11/27/2017

research article

Antibiotic Crosstalk during Co-Infections

Exoproducts secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa alter the susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus to multiple antibiotics, impacting therapeutic outcome during co-infections.

Antibiotic Crosstalk during Co-Infections

Image credit: Flickr user: NIAID

11/29/2017

research article

Adolescent Stress, trkB and Depression

Exposure to the stress hormone corticosterone during adolescence impairs decision-making behavior in adulthood. This can be normalized by treatment with a drug that stimulates the neurotrophin trkB receptor.

Adolescent Stress, trkB and Depression

Image credit: Flickr user: Ninian Reid

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