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Tree Shrews' Insensitivity to Spice

July 12, 2018

Tree Shrews' Insensitivity to Spice

Yalan Han, Ren Lai and co-workers show that a point mutation in the TRPV1 channel of tree shrews enables them to eat chili peppers with impunity; this may represent an adaptation to consuming the pepper plant Piper boehmeriaefolium, which grows in their native range and produces a capsaicin analogue.

Image credit: Thomas Foley on Unsplash

Celebrate our 15th Anniversary! Tweet @PLOSBiology #PLOSBIO15

PLOS Biology's XV Collection

07/12/2018

short reports

The Antioxidant Benefits of Sleep

What is the function of sleep? In the case of fruit flies, Vanessa Hill, Mimi Shirasu-Hiza and co-authors identify defense against oxidative stress as a function of sleep, and implicate oxidative stress in regulation of sleep.

Image credit: pbio.2005206

The Antioxidant Benefits of Sleep

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue June 2018

07/12/2018

research article

How Volvox Flips Inside Out

Analysis of the variability in the geometry of cell sheet folding during embryonic inversion in the green alga Volvox globator, by Pierre Haas, Stephanie Höhn, Raymond Goldstein and colleagues reveals details of the underlying processes driven by cell shape changes.

Image credit: pbio.2005536

How Volvox Flips Inside Out

07/06/2018

research article

Turning up the Burn in Brown Fat

Nuria Matesanz, Ivana Nikolic, Guadalupe Sabio and co-authors show that the protein kinase p38α controls brown fat thermogenesis by inhibiting the related kinase p38δ; lack of adipose p38α increases thermogenesis, while lack of p38δ reduces thermogenic capacity.

Image credit: pbio.2004455

Turning up the Burn in Brown Fat

07/09/2018

research article

Matching Blood Supply to Motor Demand

How does the somatic motor system mobilize the autonomic nervous system so that muscle oxygenation can match the physiological demand? A study of rat spinal cord by Mélissa Sourioux, Sandrine Bertrand and Jean-René Cazalets reveals intraspinal cholinergic coupling of somatic motoneurons and sympathetic preganglionic neurons.

Matching Blood Supply to Motor Demand

Image credit: pbio.2005460

07/09/2018

Short Reports

Cofilin Crucial for αβ (not γδ) T Cells

Isabel Seeland, Yvonne Samstag and co-workers use knock-in mice expressing a non-functional form of the actin remodeling protein cofilin to reveal that cofilin is differentially involved in the development of αβ versus γδ T cells.

Cofilin Crucial for αβ (not γδ) T Cells

Image credit: Flickr user NIAID

07/03/2018

research article

Beetlemania! Short & Long Germ Further Reconciled

Fluorescent live imaging of embryogenesis in the beetle Tribolium castaneum, by Matthew Benton, shows that many cells previously thought to be extraembryonic actually form large parts of the embryo.

Beetlemania! Short & Long Germ Further Reconciled

Image credit: Matthew A. Benton

07/05/2018

research article

Fly Microbiomes Go Wild

The identification of gut-colonizing bacteria from wild Drosophila melanogaster helps us to understand interactions between fruit flies and their gut microbiota in an ecological context.

Fly Microbiomes Go Wild

Image credit: pbio.2005710

07/03/2018

methods and resources

CellProfiler: Now in 3D

Announcing the release of CellProfiler version 3.0, which adds the ability to analyze images in three dimensions; the improvements that will make you want to upgrade this open-source software.

CellProfiler: Now in 3D

Image credit: pbio.2005970

07/02/2018

research article

Where Do those Memories Go?

The human vmPFC has an unexpected temporal profile of engagement during the recall of autobiographical memories, subsiding after one year but returning for memories older than two years.

Where Do those Memories Go?

Image credit: pbio.2005479

07/13/2018

plos biologue

Anatomy of a Protein Kinase Spine

Ann Stock helps celebrate our 15th anniversary by highlighting a study from Susan Taylor's lab that defines the intramolecular interactions that distinguish inactive and active states of eukaryotic protein kinases.

Anatomy of a Protein Kinase Spine

Image credit: pbio.1001680

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