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Gut Bacteria and Amino Acids Control Food Preference

April 25, 2017

Gut Bacteria and Amino Acids Control Food Preference

Animals control their diet by regulating intake of specific nutrients, including proteins. Ricardo Leitão-Gonçalves, Zita Carvalho-Santos, Ana Patricia Francisco, Carlos Ribeiro and colleagues identify essential amino acids and—surprisingly—specific gut bacteria as key factors regulating protein appetite.

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PLOS Research News

04/25/2017

research article

Humans' and Monkeys' Response to Sequences of Nonsense

A comparative intracranial recording study in human and nonhuman primates by Yukiko Kikuchi, Christopher Petkov and coworkers shows how learning to predict the order of environmental events coordinates diverse neuronal responses across time and scale.

Image credit: pbio.2000219

Humans' and Monkeys' Response to Sequences of Nonsense

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Current Issue April 2017

04/28/2017

research article

Mlh1-Mlh3 Polymerizes to Resolve

Mlh1-Mlh3 endonuclease functions in meiotic recombination to resolve double Holliday Junction intermediates into crossovers. Carol Manhart, Eric Alani and colleagues discover that—rather than acting as a structure-specific endonuclease—Mlh1-Mlh3 forms polymers that are required to generate nicks in DNA.

Image credit: pbio.2001164

Mlh1-Mlh3 Polymerizes to Resolve

04/24/2017

community page

Barcoding Insects for Outreach and Discovery

Dirk Steinke, Vanessa Breton, Emily Berzitis and Paul Hebert discuss how the School Malaise Trap Program teams up with thousands of students and educators across Canada to explore the arthropod diversity found in their schoolyards by using DNA barcoding.

Image credit: Jaclyn McKeown

Barcoding Insects for Outreach and Discovery

04/28/2017

community page

Gut Check: Evolution of a Board Game

David Coil, Cassandra Ettinger and Jonathan Eisen describe their hands-on experience of developing and producing “Gut Check: The Microbiome Game,” a board game designed to be both educational as well as fun and challenging to play.

Gut Check: Evolution of a Board Game

Image credit: pbio.2001984

04/26/2017

Perspective

Can Economics Tools Help Science?

The issue of non-replicable evidence has attracted considerable attention across biomedical and other sciences. This Perspective article by Thomas Gall, John Ioannidis and Zacharias Maniadis proposes that biomedical scientists’ efforts to improve reproducibility can be facilitated by insights and methodological approaches used in economics.

Can Economics Tools Help Science?

Image credit: Flickr user James Cridland

04/19/2017

research article

Amphioxus Prompts Re-Think of Vertebrate Brain

A study of gene expression patterns in the developing nervous system of the basal chordate amphioxus, by Beatriz Albuixech-Crespo, Jordi Garcia-Fernàndez, Luis Puelles, Manuel Irimia, José Luis Ferran and co-workers, highlights its complex molecular regionalization and challenges the classic separation between forebrain and midbrain in vertebrate brains.

Amphioxus Prompts Re-Think of Vertebrate Brain

Image credit: pbio.2001573

04/17/2017

research article

Calcium Channel Helps Balance Synapse Endocytosis

Aa synaptic vesicle-associated Ca2+ channel promotes one form of endocytosis under mild stimulation and—by triggering Ca2+ influx—another form under intense stimulation.

Calcium Channel Helps Balance Synapse Endocytosis

Image credit: Chi-Kuang Yao

04/18/2017

research article

Rapid Compensation in Multi-drug Resistant Bacteria

Compensation in multi-drug resistant bacteria can be driven by further mutations that compensate for the epistatic interactions between the resistance mutations.

Rapid Compensation in Multi-drug Resistant Bacteria

Image credit: NIAID

04/17/2017

research article

Circadian Transcriptional Logic of the Liver

Around-the-clock measurements of the mouse liver epigenome shed light on the underlying circadian gene regulatory network and its interconnection with feeding/fasting cycles.

Circadian Transcriptional Logic of the Liver

Image credit: Flickr user catmachine

04/19/2017

research article

A Critical-Like Collective State for Aggregating Amoebae

Cells of the slime mold Dictyostelium maximize their cell–cell communication range during aggregation by a critical-like state known from phase transitions in physical systems.

A Critical-Like Collective State for Aggregating Amoebae

Image credit: pbio.1002602

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