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Gut Dynamics Drive Microbial Competition

July 26, 2016

Gut Dynamics Drive Microbial Competition

Live imaging of a model intestinal microbiota by Travis Wiles, Matthew Jemielita, Raghuveer Parthasarathy and co-workers reveals that enteric neural function and peristalsis, combined with the spatial structure of microbial communities, can drive competition between bacterial species.

Image credit: Matthew Jemielita, Travis Wiles

Open Highlights: Highlighting Open Access research from PLOS and beyond

Biologue

07/28/2016

Perspective

Could Seasonal Conception Prevent Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy?

Zika infection during pregnancy can result in microcephaly, fetal malformations, and miscarriage. Micaela Elvira Martinez proposes reducing this risk by planning conception seasonally to align sensitive periods of gestation with the low-transmission season.

Image credit: CDC/Cynthia Goldsmith

Could Seasonal Conception Prevent Zika Virus Infection during Pregnancy?

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue June 2016

07/28/2016

 Perspective

Biobanking for Domesticated Animals Too

Linn Groeneveld, Peer Berg and co-authors point out that well-established domesticated animal biobanks and integrated networks harbor immense potential for great scientific advances with broad societal impacts, which are currently not being fully realized.

Image credit: Flickr user Kat Dodd

Biobanking for Domesticated Animals Too

07/26/2016

essay

Caging and Uncaging Genetics

Experiments on a single genotype are powerful and appropriate. Experiments on multiple genotypes are powerful and appropriate. Tom Little and Nick Colegrave conclude that the right experimental design depends on the question being asked.

Image credit: Eric Miska

Caging and Uncaging Genetics

07/25/2016

primer

Two for the Price of One: NMNAT2's Neuroprotective Kit

This Primer by Angela Lavado-Roldán and Rafael Fernández-Chacón examines recent research showing that a brain enzyme known to ameliorate excitoxicity and axonal degeneration also acts as a molecular chaperone to prevent protein aggregation. Read the accompanying Research Article.

Two for the Price of One: NMNAT2's Neuroprotective Kit

Image credit: pbio.1002472

07/26/2016

primer

Notch Signaling: Activation vs Repression

This Primer by Tilman Borggrefe and Franz Oswald examines recent research that reveals the structural rearrangements that determine whether the Notch pathway transcription factor CSL/Su(H) activates or represses transcription. Read the accompanying Research Article.

Notch Signaling: Activation vs Repression

Image credit: pbio.1002524

07/19/2016

 Research Article

Mitochondrial Dynamics and Wolfram Syndrome

Michal Cagalinec, Mailis Liiv, Allen Kaasik and colleagues reveal that deficiency of the protein Wolframin in Wolfram syndrome triggers a stress cascade in the endoplasmic reticulum; this leads to altered calcium homeostasis, which in turn impairs mitochondrial dynamics and consequently inhibits neuronal development.

Mitochondrial Dynamics and Wolfram Syndrome

Image credit: Michal Cagalinec, Annika Vaarmann, Allen Kaasik

07/18/2016

Research article

Mitochondria and Presynaptic Ca2+ Clearance

Mitochondria at individual presynaptic boutons play a synapse-specific role in regulating neurotransmission through the ability to regulate presynaptic calcium levels.

Mitochondria and Presynaptic Ca2+ Clearance

Image credit: pbio.1002516

07/18/2016

research matters

How Cells Process Information and Make Decisions

Michael Laub on the importance of understanding the communication of complex biological signals by our own cells and by bacterial cells that live in or on us.

How Cells Process Information and Make Decisions

Image credit: pbio.1002519

07/18/2016

editorial

Introducing PLOS Biology's "Research Matters"

PLOS Biology's “Research Matters” is a new article series in which active scientists engage with the public about why basic research in their field matters.

Introducing PLOS Biology's "Research Matters"

Image credit: pbio.1002518