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Network Model of the Musculoskeletal System

January 18, 2018

Network Model of the Musculoskeletal System

A novel application of network science to the muscles and bones of the human body, by Andrew Murphy, Danielle Bassett and co-workers, relates the structure of the musculoskeletal network to the organization of the motor cortex, and network dynamics to the duration of injury recovery.

Image credit: Brittany Bennett

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PLOS Research News

01/16/2018

research article

Heads and Tails of Acorn Worms

A developmental study in the hemichordate acorn worm Saccoglossus kowalevskii, by Sébastien Darras, Christopher Lowe and co-authors, reveals that canonical Wnt signaling is involved in repressing anterior fates and promoting mid axial fates but does not specify posterior fates. 

Image credit: pbio.2003698

Heads and Tails of Acorn Worms

Recently Published Articles

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Current Issue December 2017

01/18/2018

research article

Controlling Recollection

A study in mice by Dino Dvorak, André Fenton and colleagues reveals that the transient dominance of slow gamma over mid-frequency gamma oscillations in the hippocampus is a signature of recollection; excessive recollection of inappropriate memories explains the cognitive inflexibility in a mouse model for Fragile X Syndrome.

Image credit: Understanding Animal Research, Flickr

Controlling Recollection

01/18/2018

essay

Darwin, Pasteur, and Infectious Disease Control

This Essay by Samuel Alizon and Pierre-Olivier Méthot recognises that the research of Louis Pasteur and Charles Darwin had more overlap than classically thought, and that microbial evolutionary ecology, at the intersection of their fields, opens new routes to controlling infectious diseases.

Image credit: George Richmond, Albert Edelfelt, via pbio.2003815

Darwin, Pasteur, and Infectious Disease Control

01/16/2018

research article

Rogue Metabolic Enzyme Promotes Cancer

A molecular and functional analysis by Yu-Ting Chou, Horng-Dar Wang, Chiou-Hwa Yuh and colleagues reveals that ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, a key enzyme in the pentose phosphate pathway, promotes colorectal cancer formation by stabilizing β-catenin, entering the nucleus and helping to activate β-catenin target genes.

Rogue Metabolic Enzyme Promotes Cancer

Image credit: pbio.2003714

01/17/2018

primer

Bacterial Periplasm: Size Matters

This Primer by Samuel Miller and Nina Salama explores the periplasm that lies between the inner and outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and discusses exciting new work indicating that its size is critical for the function of bacterial organelles and stress responses. Read the related Research Article.

Bacterial Periplasm: Size Matters

Image credit: pbio.2004935

01/09/2018

research article

The Post-Glacial Peopling of Scandinavia

A study of ancient DNA from Mesolithic humans by Torsten Günther, Helena Malmström, Emma Svensson, Ayça Omrak, Jan Storå, Anders Götherström, Mattias Jakobsson and co-workers reveals how hunter-gatherer populations colonized Scandinavia in two waves and via two different routes after the last glacial period. 

The Post-Glacial Peopling of Scandinavia

Image credit: Beate Kjørslevik

01/09/2018

research article

Climate Change, Cyanobacteria and Food Web Collapse

Experiment and modelling shows how climate change can alter the flow and transfer efficiency of energy, leading to a collapse at the base of benthic food webs.

Climate Change, Cyanobacteria and Food Web Collapse

Image credit: Lance Anderson

01/11/2018

short report

Genome Downsizing and World Domination

Genome downsizing during the Cretaceous can explain how flowering plants outcompeted ferns and gymnosperms, by enabling them to construct smaller cells.

Genome Downsizing and World Domination

Image credit: Flickr user alightbourne

01/12/2018

THE XV Collection

Watching a Vesicle Form

In the first of a series of 12 blog posts, Sandra Schmid discusses her favorite PLOS Biology paper: "This seminal paper represents a significant leap in our understanding of vesicle trafficking." Read the paper itself here.

Watching a Vesicle Form

Image credit: John Heuser

01/12/2018

THE XV Collection

15 Years of Open Science

To mark our 15th birthday, this Collection will showcase 12 monthly blog posts, where our Ed Board Members (starting with Sandra Schmid) pick their favorite articles. For more, read this blog post by Lauren Richardson.

15 Years of Open Science

Image credit: Maxipixel

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