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Protein Methyltransferase Promotes Chronic Pain

February 14, 2018

Protein Methyltransferase Promotes Chronic Pain

A combination of genetic, biochemical and behavioral approaches by Hanneke Willemen, Niels Eijkelkamp and co-workers identifies the hitherto uncharacterized FAM173B protein as a lysine methyltransferase that resides in mitochondria and contributes to the neurobiology of pathological pain.

Image credit: pbio.2003452

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02/09/2018

essay

Microbiome Challenges our Concept of Self

This Essay by Tobias Rees, Thomas Bosch and Angela Douglas explores the extent to which the new field of microbiome research challenges the three classical biological explanations of the individual self: the immune system, the brain, and the genome.

Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Microbiome Challenges our Concept of Self

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Current Issue January 2018

02/13/2018

research article

How Flies Deal with Ambiguity

How do simpler animals, such as fruit flies, interpret ambiguous visual stimuli? This study of Drosophila melanogaster by Franziska Toepfer, Reinhard Wolf and Martin Heisenberg reveals multi-stability in its visual control of straight flight when presented with transparent motion stimuli in a flight simulator.Read the accompanying Primer.

Image credit: Flickr user amantedar

How Flies Deal with Ambiguity

02/14/2018

primer

Fruit Flies: Multi-Stable Geniuses?

Our ability to perceive a single stimulus in different ways is often thought of as a window into higher brain functions. This Primer by Christopher Pack and Jamie Theobald explores a recent study which reveals that fruit flies show similar signs of multi-stable perception.

Image credit: pbio.2003113

Fruit Flies: Multi-Stable Geniuses?

02/07/2018

research article

Temperature Dependence of Parasite Dynamics

Devin Kirk, Pepijn Luijckx and colleagues use a Daphnia-microsporidian model to show that the metabolic theory of ecology can predict the temperature dependence of within-host parasite traits and dynamics. 

Temperature Dependence of Parasite Dynamics

Image credit: Per Harald Olsen/NTNU, via Flickr

02/05/2018

research article

Organisation of the Primate Cortex

Basilis Zikopoulos, Miguel Ángel García-Cabezas and Helen Barbas show that cortical architecture varies systematically between primate species, and in parallel with connections in the underlying white matter, establishing a template that can inform studies of human and non-human brain networks and their disruption in disease. 

Organisation of the Primate Cortex

Image credit: pbio.2004559

02/06/2018

research article

Death by a Thousand Nibbles

Neutrophils are early-responding host immune cells that actively attack and kill invading extracellular pathogens. Frances Mercer, Patricia Johnson and co-workers describe trogocytosis — a previously unknown mechanism by which neutrophils kill the large, motile pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis.

Death by a Thousand Nibbles

Image credit: pbio.2003885

01/29/2018

editorial

The Importance of Being Second

"Scooped"? We prefer to call it "complementary research," recognising its important role in the reproducibility of science. Learn more about our newly formalised policy.

The Importance of Being Second

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