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Excess Retinoids Hit Hearts Twice

November 28, 2016

Excess Retinoids Hit Hearts Twice

By studying the hearts of zebrafish embryos unable to degrade retinoic acid, Ariel Rydeen and Joshua Waxman reveal that failure to add second heart field progenitors results in outflow tract defects, and disruption of the extracellular environment causes loss of ventricular integrity.

Image credit: pbio.2000504

PLOS Research News: stay up-to-date with research published in PLOS

PLOS Research News

11/28/2016

Research Article

Kaposi's Sarcoma Virus and the microRNA Turf War

Some cancer viruses express their own microRNAs; this study by Christine Happel, Dhivya Ramalingam and Joseph Ziegelbauer investigates how a virus (Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus) can counteract the human antiviral protein MCPIP1 that otherwise degrades viral microRNAs.

Image credit: Wikipedia: Poulos~commonswiki

Kaposi's Sarcoma Virus and the microRNA Turf War

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue November 2016

12/02/2016

meta-research article

Scientific Rigor of Animal Experiments

An analysis of animal license applications and their associated publications, by Lucile Vogt, Thomas Reichlin, Christina Nathues and Hanno Würbel, suggests that risk of bias is partly predicted by study protocols; review of applications for scientific rigor could improve scientific validity, thereby avoiding unnecessary harm to animals.

Image credit: Flickr user Understanding Animal Research

Scientific Rigor of Animal Experiments

11/30/2016

research article

Active State Mechanics of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases

Eukaryotic protein kinases regulate over a third of the human proteome. This study by Hiruy Meharena, Susan Taylor and co-workers shows that their active state mechanics are harmoniously governed by intramolecular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions from different regions of the catalytic core.

Image credit: pbio.2000127

Active State Mechanics of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases

12/01/2016

community page

Enhancing the Reporting of Critical Lab Incidents

This Community Page article by Ulrich Dirnagl, Sebastian Major and colleagues proposes Critical Incident Reporting (CIR) as a simple and effective method to enhance the quality of basic and preclinical academic research; it also presents LabCIRS – a simple, free, open-source software tool for implementing CIR in research groups, labs, or large institutions. 

Enhancing the Reporting of Critical Lab Incidents

Image credit: Flickr user: Horia Varlan

11/23/2016

Research Article

SOX2, PI3K and Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

A study of tracheobronchial basal cells by Bo Ram Kim, Nadeem Moghal and co-workers reveals a mechanism by which lung squamous cell carcinoma is almost universally initiated by exploitation of a stem cell injury response involving SOX2 and PI3K.

SOX2, PI3K and Lung Cancer Pathogenesis

Image credit: Flickr user: Ed Uthman

11/21/2016

 Research Article

Normalization Depends on Emotional Valence

Using a combination of psychophysics and functional MRI, Xilin Zhang, Leslie Ungerleider and co-authors reveal that emotional attention interacts with normalization processes depending on emotional valence (positive or negative faces), best explained by feedback modulation from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

Normalization Depends on Emotional Valence

Image credit: pbio.1002578

11/18/2016

research article

Phylosymbiosis Across Animals

Microbial communities can strongly predict host species origin and assemble in an evolutionarily-informed manner; communities are better suited for their resident host species than for closely related ones.

Phylosymbiosis Across Animals

Image credit: pbio.2000225

11/23/2016

 Research Article

Microglial Response and Neurodegeneration

Patterns of prion disease are not determined by misfolded prion protein alone; rather, a complex microglial response appears to determine selective vulnerability and provides new strategies for therapy.

Microglial Response and Neurodegeneration

Image credit: pbio.1002579

11/15/2016

Research Article

Perceiving Degraded Speech

Neuroimaging and computational modelling explain how the human brain uses prior expectations to improve our perception of degraded speech - by using prediction errors, but not sharpening.

Perceiving Degraded Speech

Image credit: Flickr user: anika

12/02/2016

plos biologue

ASCB 2016, San Francisco

PLOS Biology editor Ines Alvarez-Garcia looks forward to five days of fantastic cell biology at the ASCB conference in San Francisco and presents some of the recent papers we've published.

ASCB 2016, San Francisco

Image credit: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1002537