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Vocal Development through Lung Growth

February 20, 2018

Vocal Development through Lung Growth

A developmental study in marmosets by Yisi Zhang and Asif Ghazanfar reveals that the decline in the production of context-inappropriate vocalizations is the result of lung growth rather than changes in central nervous system structure.

Image credit: Leszek Leszczynski via Flickr

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PLOS Research News

02/20/2018

research article

Redesigning the Rhizosphere

Designing bacterial communities with predictable effects on the host is a major challenge of microbiome research. Sur Herrera Paredes, Tianxiang Gao, Jeffery Dangl, Gabriel Castrillo and colleagues use a generalizable experimental framework to rationally design bacterial consortia that impact plant performance in a predictable manner.

Image credit: pbio.0060230

Redesigning the Rhizosphere

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Current Issue

Current Issue January 2018

02/22/2018

meta-research article

Diversity Improves Animal Research

Bernhard Voelkl, Lucile Vogt, Emily Sena, Hanno Würbel use simulations based on real data to show that single-laboratory studies fail to predict treatment effects accurately, while even simple multi-laboratory designs improve the accuracy and reproducibility of treatment effects substantially, without a need for larger sample sizes.

Image credit: pbio.2003693

Diversity Improves Animal Research

02/16/2018

research article

A Damped Oscillator Drives Fly Segmentation

Berta Verd, Johannes Jaeger and co-authors show that oscillatory patterning dynamics in the posterior of early Drosophila embryos indicate a segmentation mode much more similar to the ancestral mechanism of segmentation than previously thought.

Image credit: pbio.2003174

A Damped Oscillator Drives Fly Segmentation

02/22/2018

research article

Effective Polyploidy Delays Mutation Effects

A combination of recombineering experiments and computer simulations by Lei Sun, Helen Alexander, Sebastian Bonhoeffer and co-workers shows that after a bacterial cell mutates, it takes several generations before the mutation actually becomes effective. 

Effective Polyploidy Delays Mutation Effects

Image credit: Daniel J. Kiviet, Lei Sun

02/23/2018

research article

Rice Root Microbiome Tracks the Plant's Life Cycle

Joseph Edwards, Venkatesan Sundaresan and colleagues find that microbiota associated with roots of field-grown rice show dynamic changes in their composition that are correlated with the life cycle of the host plant.

Rice Root Microbiome Tracks the Plant's Life Cycle

Image credit: Flickr user: Korea_0001

02/14/2018

research article

Protein Methyltransferase Promotes Chronic Pain

A combination of genetic, biochemical and behavioral approaches by Hanneke Willemen, Niels Eijkelkamp and co-workers identifies the hitherto uncharacterized FAM173B protein as a lysine methyltransferase that resides in mitochondria and contributes to the neurobiology of pathological pain.

Protein Methyltransferase Promotes Chronic Pain

Image credit: pbio.2003452

02/09/2018

essay

Microbiome Challenges our Concept of Self

This Essay explores how the new field of microbiome research challenges the three classical biological explanations of the individual self: the immune system, the brain, and the genome.

Microbiome Challenges our Concept of Self

Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

02/13/2018

research article

How Flies Deal with Ambiguity

This study reveals multi-stability in ia fruit fly's visual control of straight flight when presented with transparent motion stimuli in a flight simulator.Read the accompanying Primer.

How Flies Deal with Ambiguity

Image credit: Flickr user amantedar

02/19/2018

PLos biologue

The Exquisite Precision of T Cell Receptors

As part of our 15 Year Anniversary celebrations, Avinash Bhandoola and Christelle Harly highlight a seminal investigation into how T cells distinguish between self and non-self ligands.

The Exquisite Precision of T Cell Receptors

Image credit: RCSB PDB

01/29/2018

editorial

The Importance of Being Second

"Scooped"? We prefer to call it "complementary research," recognising its important role in the reproducibility of science. Learn more about our newly formalised policy.

The Importance of Being Second

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