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PLoS Pathogens Issue Image | Vol. 7(2) February 2011

PLoS Pathogens Issue Image | Vol. 7(2) February 2011

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Destruction of blood vessels by an hemorrhagic virus and spread to adjacent tissues.

This fli1:GFP transgenic zebrafish larva has been inoculated with Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV), fixed 24 hours later, processed for whole-mount immunohistochemistry, and imaged with a confocal microscope to reveal virus-infected cells (anti-G-IHNV antibody, red), endothelial cells (GFP, green), and nuclei (blue). Infection of several vessels can be observed, especially at the top of the head, where loss of GFP expression has occurred, as well as infection of neighboring tissue. Although at this stage the larva does not display obvious macroscopic signs of disease, it is already doomed (see Ludwig et al., doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1001269).

Image Credit: Nuno Palha, Institut Pasteur

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Destruction of blood vessels by an hemorrhagic virus and spread to adjacent tissues.

This fli1:GFP transgenic zebrafish larva has been inoculated with Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus (IHNV), fixed 24 hours later, processed for whole-mount immunohistochemistry, and imaged with a confocal microscope to reveal virus-infected cells (anti-G-IHNV antibody, red), endothelial cells (GFP, green), and nuclei (blue). Infection of several vessels can be observed, especially at the top of the head, where loss of GFP expression has occurred, as well as infection of neighboring tissue. Although at this stage the larva does not display obvious macroscopic signs of disease, it is already doomed (see Ludwig et al., doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1001269).

Image Credit: Nuno Palha, Institut Pasteur

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.ppat.v07.i02.g001