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Correction: Survival of viral pathogens in animal feed ingredients under transboundary shipping models

  • Scott A. Dee,
  • Fernando V. Bauermann,
  • Megan C. Niederwerder,
  • Aaron Singrey,
  • Travis Clement,
  • Marcelo de Lima,
  • Craig Long,
  • Gilbert Patterson,
  • Maureen A. Sheahan,
  • Ana M. M. Stoian,
  • Vlad Petrovan,
  • Cassandra K. Jones,
  • Jon De Jong,
  • Ju Ji,
  • Gordon D. Spronk,
  • Luke Minion,
  • Jane Christopher-Hennings,
  • Jeff J. Zimmerman,
  • Raymond R. R. Rowland,
  • Eric Nelson,
  • Paul Sundberg,
  •  [ ... ],
  • Diego G. Diel
  • [ view all ]
  • [ view less ]

Correction: Survival of viral pathogens in animal feed ingredients under transboundary shipping models

  • Scott A. Dee, 
  • Fernando V. Bauermann, 
  • Megan C. Niederwerder, 
  • Aaron Singrey, 
  • Travis Clement, 
  • Marcelo de Lima, 
  • Craig Long, 
  • Gilbert Patterson, 
  • Maureen A. Sheahan, 
  • Ana M. M. Stoian
PLOS
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Due to new calculations, there are revisions to the Results section under the sub-heading “Half-life estimates.” Please see the corrected text here:

To determine the rate of decay of virus in feed, half-life estimates were calculated for five pathogens: SVA, PSV, FCV, BHV-1 and ASFV using end point titers determined on Batch 4 samples (Table 4). Overall, half-life appeared to be influenced by virus and ingredient type, with FCV and SVA displaying extended half-lives in samples of conventional soybean meal, 44.4 days and 22.3 days, respectively. SVA appeared to be the most stable virus in feed, with half-lives ranging from 3.9 to 22.3 days across the 10 ingredients in which it survived. Remarkably, FCV presented the longest half-life of all viruses in conventional soybean meal (44.6 days), but its half-life was much shorter (4.3 to 7.9 days) in the other three ingredients that contained viable virus. In contrast, PSV (5.1 to 8.6 days), ASFV (4.1 to 5.1 days) and BHV-1 (4.4 days) displayed shorter, but relatively consistent half-lives across the ingredients in which they survived. Interestingly, the half-life of the ASFV stock virus (4.7 days), was similar to that of virus in the presence of feed matrices.

As a result of the new calculations, there are updates to Table 4. Please see the corrected Table 4 here.

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Table 4. An overview of viability across all viruses tested in the study, including PEDV [14] highlighting half-life estimates (in days) of viruses presenting measurable endpoint titers across ingredients on Batch 4 samples.

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0214529.t001

Reference

  1. 1. Dee SA, Bauermann FV, Niederwerder MC, Singrey A, Clement T, de Lima M, et al. (2018) Survival of viral pathogens in animal feed ingredients under transboundary shipping models. PLoS ONE 13(3): e0194509. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194509 pmid:29558524