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PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases Issue Image | Vol. 2(10) October 2008

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases Issue Image | Vol. 2(10) October 2008

PLOS
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Dengue virus is unable to productively infect dermal-type macrophages.

The image shows a human CD209+ macrophage, in which the dengue virus envelope E protein, fused to green fluorescent protein, is not co-localized with the acidic (red) perinuclear compartments. Envelope acidification is critical to initiate the viral life cycle. IL-10, present in the human skin, is required for the formation of these macrophages. Understanding these infection events shortly after the mosquito bite can help explain why many dengue infections are asymptomatic (see Kwan et al., doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0000311).

Image Credit: Marion Decossas, Erika Navarro-Sanchez, and Hélène Dumortier

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Dengue virus is unable to productively infect dermal-type macrophages.

The image shows a human CD209+ macrophage, in which the dengue virus envelope E protein, fused to green fluorescent protein, is not co-localized with the acidic (red) perinuclear compartments. Envelope acidification is critical to initiate the viral life cycle. IL-10, present in the human skin, is required for the formation of these macrophages. Understanding these infection events shortly after the mosquito bite can help explain why many dengue infections are asymptomatic (see Kwan et al., doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0000311).

Image Credit: Marion Decossas, Erika Navarro-Sanchez, and Hélène Dumortier

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pntd.v02.i10.g001