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PLoS Medicine Issue Image | Vol. 6(12) December 2009

PLoS Medicine Issue Image | Vol. 6(12) December 2009

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A New Year's wish list for authors, reviewers, readers—and ourselves.

This issue of PLoS Medicine features two Policy Forums on blindness. In the first, Paul Courtright and colleagues (e177) argue that the patterns of global childhood blindness are changing.  With reductions in nutritional and infectious causes of blindness, intrauterine and genetic causes have become more important, suggesting a need to reassess research, training, and programmatic requirements. In the second, Susan Lewallen and Amir Bedri Kello (e184) argue that human resources management will be crucial in reaching the global goal of eliminating avoidable blindness in sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2020. Also, in this month's Editorial the PLoS Medicine editors reflect upon how much the publishing of research relies on a foundation of trust between authors, editors, peer reviewers, and readers. They argue that this relationship sometimes becomes tried, tested, and even broken. Thus, in the spirit of New Year's resolutions, the editors look to the future and set down some guidelines for authors, readers, reviewers, and editors themselves to maintain and renew the trusting foundations that are essential to publishing research.

Image Credit: Ray Lopez, DownTown Pictures at flickr.com

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A New Year's wish list for authors, reviewers, readers—and ourselves.

This issue of PLoS Medicine features two Policy Forums on blindness. In the first, Paul Courtright and colleagues (e177) argue that the patterns of global childhood blindness are changing.  With reductions in nutritional and infectious causes of blindness, intrauterine and genetic causes have become more important, suggesting a need to reassess research, training, and programmatic requirements. In the second, Susan Lewallen and Amir Bedri Kello (e184) argue that human resources management will be crucial in reaching the global goal of eliminating avoidable blindness in sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2020. Also, in this month's Editorial the PLoS Medicine editors reflect upon how much the publishing of research relies on a foundation of trust between authors, editors, peer reviewers, and readers. They argue that this relationship sometimes becomes tried, tested, and even broken. Thus, in the spirit of New Year's resolutions, the editors look to the future and set down some guidelines for authors, readers, reviewers, and editors themselves to maintain and renew the trusting foundations that are essential to publishing research.

Image Credit: Ray Lopez, DownTown Pictures at flickr.com

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pmed.v06.i12.g001