Advertisement
  • Loading metrics

PLoS Medicine Issue Image | Vol. 5(3) March 2008

PLoS Medicine Issue Image | Vol. 5(3) March 2008

PLOS
x
  • Article
  • Metrics
  • Comments
  • Media Coverage

Network Theory and Medicine.

The image this month is a map of the Internet created by Matt Britt from data from the Opte Project. The closeup shows how nodes representing Internet addresses are connected (see the description in Wikimedia Commons).

The image relates to the theme of the editorial: network theory and how it is increasingly used to understand connections and relationships in health and medicine, whether at a cellular, population, or social level. In a paper on the dynamics of influenza transmission published this month (Mossong, et al. e74), network analysis helped the authors produce a mathematical model suggesting that 5- to 19-year-olds will suffer the highest burden of respiratory infection during any initial spread. Another paper (Lewis, et al. e50) using phylodynamics—a mix of genetics, epidemiology, and evolutionary biology—elucidated a transmission network that provides insights into HIV prevention.

Image Credit: Image by Matt Britt, using data from the Opte Project

thumbnail
Network Theory and Medicine.

The image this month is a map of the Internet created by Matt Britt from data from the Opte Project. The closeup shows how nodes representing Internet addresses are connected (see the description in Wikimedia Commons).

The image relates to the theme of the editorial: network theory and how it is increasingly used to understand connections and relationships in health and medicine, whether at a cellular, population, or social level. In a paper on the dynamics of influenza transmission published this month (Mossong, et al. e74), network analysis helped the authors produce a mathematical model suggesting that 5- to 19-year-olds will suffer the highest burden of respiratory infection during any initial spread. Another paper (Lewis, et al. e50) using phylodynamics—a mix of genetics, epidemiology, and evolutionary biology—elucidated a transmission network that provides insights into HIV prevention.

Image Credit: Image by Matt Britt, using data from the Opte Project

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pmed.v05.i03.g001