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PLoS Genetics Issue Image | Vol. 14(7) July 2018

PLoS Genetics Issue Image | Vol. 14(7) July 2018

PLOS
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Fruit flies trigger oocyte apoptosis after exposure to predatory wasp.

A light microscope image of dissected Drosophila ovary where DNA (white) reveals perfectly round nurse and follicle cell nuclei of intact egg chambers in addition to bright-staining, condensed fragmented DNA from apoptotic nurse cells expressing activated caspases (red). The outline of egg surfaces is labelled by wheatgerm agglutinin (green). Predatory wasps inject their eggs into Drosophila larvae, but adult female flies can see the predator, or simply be informed by other flies exposed to wasps, and flies deprive this predator of larvae by triggering death of its own oocytes and halting egg production. See Kacsoh et al.

Download July's cover page.

Image Credit: Balint Z. Kacsoh, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

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Fruit flies trigger oocyte apoptosis after exposure to predatory wasp.

A light microscope image of dissected Drosophila ovary where DNA (white) reveals perfectly round nurse and follicle cell nuclei of intact egg chambers in addition to bright-staining, condensed fragmented DNA from apoptotic nurse cells expressing activated caspases (red). The outline of egg surfaces is labelled by wheatgerm agglutinin (green). Predatory wasps inject their eggs into Drosophila larvae, but adult female flies can see the predator, or simply be informed by other flies exposed to wasps, and flies deprive this predator of larvae by triggering death of its own oocytes and halting egg production. See Kacsoh et al.

Download July's cover page.

Image Credit: Balint Z. Kacsoh, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pgen.v14.i07.g001