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PLoS Genetics Issue Image | Vol. 6(5) May 2010

PLoS Genetics Issue Image | Vol. 6(5) May 2010

PLOS
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Endophytic colonization.

Many endophytic bacteria have demonstrated plant-growth promoting abilities that are currently being exploited to improve productivity of food and feedstocks. In this issue of PLoS Genetics, Taghavi et al. identify functions essential for the successful colonization and endophytic association of Enterobacter sp. 638 with its poplar host, with the endophyte responsible for the production of a phytohormone, and a precursor for another, which poplar is unable to synthesize, and where the production of the plant-growth promoting compounds depended on the presence of plant-synthesized compounds, such as sucrose, in the growth medium.

Image Credit: Safiyh Taghavi and Dmytro Nykypanchuk (Brookhaven National Laboratory; image taken at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials)

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Endophytic colonization.

Many endophytic bacteria have demonstrated plant-growth promoting abilities that are currently being exploited to improve productivity of food and feedstocks. In this issue of PLoS Genetics, Taghavi et al. identify functions essential for the successful colonization and endophytic association of Enterobacter sp. 638 with its poplar host, with the endophyte responsible for the production of a phytohormone, and a precursor for another, which poplar is unable to synthesize, and where the production of the plant-growth promoting compounds depended on the presence of plant-synthesized compounds, such as sucrose, in the growth medium.

Image Credit: Safiyh Taghavi and Dmytro Nykypanchuk (Brookhaven National Laboratory; image taken at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials)

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pgen.v06.i05.g001