Advertisement
  • Loading metrics

PLoS Genetics Issue Image | Vol. 1(4) October 2005

PLoS Genetics Issue Image | Vol. 1(4) October 2005

PLOS
x

Image depicting mythological Iris

All retroviruses utilize their envelope genes to mediate infection. However, a host gene, Iris, that is highly conserved in many Drosophila species has itself been derived from a retroviral envelope gene (see Malik et al.) highlighting an evolutionarily intriguing acquisition event. In Greek mythology, Iris was the benevolent sibling of the malevolent winged monsters, the Harpies.

Image Credit: Photograph reproduced with permission of the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design (bequest of Susan Martin Allien). Cover design by Liana Holmberg.

thumbnail
Image depicting mythological Iris

All retroviruses utilize their envelope genes to mediate infection. However, a host gene, Iris, that is highly conserved in many Drosophila species has itself been derived from a retroviral envelope gene (see Malik et al.) highlighting an evolutionarily intriguing acquisition event. In Greek mythology, Iris was the benevolent sibling of the malevolent winged monsters, the Harpies.

Image Credit: Photograph reproduced with permission of the Museum of Art, Rhode Island School of Design (bequest of Susan Martin Allien). Cover design by Liana Holmberg.

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pgen.v01.i04.g001