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Micropeptide

December 13, 2018

Micropeptide

Image credit: Sousa and Farkas

Topic Pages Collection

This collection aims to increase the coverage of computational biology and genetics-related topics                                                  in Wikipedia by rewarding authors with a citable, PubMed-indexed version of the living document on Wikipedia.

Collection

12/10/2018

Research Article

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11-associated alleles of Ttbk2 dominantly interfere with ciliogenesis and cilium stability

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11 (SCA11) is a rare, dominantly inherited human ataxia characterized by atrophy of Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum. In this work, Bowie et al present evidence that SCA11-associated mutations are dominant negative alleles, and that the resulting truncated protein (TTBK2SCA11) interferes with the function of full length TTBK2 in mediating ciliogenesis.

Image credit: Emily Bowie and colleagues

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 11-associated alleles of Ttbk2 dominantly interfere with ciliogenesis and cilium stability

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue November 2018

12/13/2018

research article

Biallelic mutations in nucleoporin NUP88 cause lethal fetal akinesia deformation sequence

Here, Bonnin, Cabochette et al report biallelic mutations in the nucleoporin NUP88 as a novel cause of lethal fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS) in two families. The authors show that genetic disruption of nup88 in zebrafish results in pleiotropic developmental defects reminiscent of those seen in affected human fetuses, including locomotor defects as well as defects at neuromuscular junctions.

Image credit: Bonnin, Cabochette and colleagues

Biallelic mutations in nucleoporin NUP88 cause lethal fetal akinesia deformation sequence

12/12/2018

research article

Multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of 19 Fanconi anemia pathway genes in zebrafish revealed their roles in growth, sexual development and fertility

Ramanagoudr-Bhojappa, Carrington et al systematically target the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway in zebrafish using CRISPR/Cas9. The authors generate 36 zebrafish lines with loss-of-function mutations in 19 FA pathway genes and show that all fish lines survive to adulthood.

Image credit: Ramanagoudr-Bhojappa, Carrington and colleagues

Multiplexed CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of 19 Fanconi anemia pathway genes in zebrafish revealed their roles in growth, sexual development and fertility

12/13/2018

Topic Page

Micropeptide

Sousa and Farkas discuss micropeptides. Commonly defined as polypeptides of less than 100-150 amino acids in length, micropeptides were once overlooked due to their small size, however, hundreds of thousands have now been identified. This article is also published as a live page on Wikipedia.

Micropeptide

Image credit: Sousa and Farkas

12/13/2018

Perspective

R-loops modulate Trypanosome antigenic variation

Prister and Seifert comment on work by Briggs et al, who show that RNA-DNA hybrids, called R-loops, form preferentially within sequences termed the 70 bp repeats in the actively transcribed Variant Surface Glycoprotein expression sites in Trypanosoma brucei.

R-loops modulate Trypanosome antigenic variation

Image credit: Prister and Seifert

11/21/2018

Perspective

The many fates of tissue regeneration

Abdullah and Duronio comment on work by Verghese and Su, who show that stem-cell–like behavior can be induced in Drosophila cells in response to tissue damage resulting from ionizing radiation.

The many fates of tissue regeneration

Image credit: Abdullah and Duronio

11/15/2018

TOPIC PAGE

Selfish genetic elements

Ågren and Clark discuss selfish genetic elements: once dismissed as genetic curiosities, with little relevance for evolution, they are now recognized to affect a wide swath of biological processes. This article is also published as a live page on Wikipedia.

Selfish genetic elements

Image credit: Ågren and Clark

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