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Understanding Images

This collection of blog posts and articles showcases the research that created or inspired the journal's monthly                                                  issue image, and explains how the image helps us to understand the research question addressed in the manuscript.

COLLECTION

06/13/2019

Research Article

Risk of spontaneous preterm birth and fetal growth associates with fetal SLIT2

Here, performing a GWAS in a population of Finnish origin, Tiensuu et al identify a variant in SLIT2 that is associated with the risk of spontaneous preterm birth. The authors further show that SLIT2 and its receptor, ROBO1, are expressed in placental cells, and their mRNA levels are higher in placentas from spontaneous preterm deliveries, and that ROBO1 regulates expression of PSG genes and genes involved in inflammation.

Image credit: Heli Tiensuu and colleagues

Risk of spontaneous preterm birth and fetal growth associates with fetal SLIT2

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue May 2019

06/13/2019

Research Article

Genome-wide association study of multisite chronic pain in UK Biobank

The reasons why some individuals develop chronic pain and others do not are not fully understood. In this study, Johnston et al identify genetic variants associated with chronic pain and assess how this variation correlates with other diseases and traits. The authors find that chronic pain is associated with several genes involved in brain function and development and is correlated with mental health and autoimmune traits, including depression, PTSD and asthma.

Image credit: Kiera J. A. Johnston and colleagues

Genome-wide association study of multisite chronic pain in UK Biobank

06/13/2019

Research Article

A new identified suppressor of Cdc7p/SepH kinase, PomA, regulates fungal asexual reproduction via affecting phosphorylation of MAPK-HogA

Here, Zhou and colleagues identify PomA as a suppressor of a conserved SepH (Cdc7p) kinase in the septation initiation network (SIN) cascade. The authors find that phosphorylation of hogA regulated by the SIN-SepH-PomA kinase cascade plays a key role for fungal cell septation and asexual reproduction. 

 

Image credit: Xiaogang Zhou and colleagues

A new identified suppressor of Cdc7p/SepH kinase, PomA, regulates fungal asexual reproduction via affecting phosphorylation of MAPK-HogA

06/06/2019

Research Article

Mitochondrial fusion is required for regulation of mitochondrial DNA replication

Here, Silva Ramos et al demonstrate that rapid mtDNA synthesis in proliferating tissue-culture cells or cardiomyocytes during post-natal heart development requires mitochondrial fusion. The authors also find that the absence of mitochondrial fusion in the mouse heart is not associated with mtDNA integrity defects, but instead affects the replication of mtDNA.

Mitochondrial fusion is required for regulation of mitochondrial DNA replication

Image credit: Eduardo Silva Ramos and colleagues

06/10/2019

Research Article

Essential gene deletions producing gigantic bacteria

Although essential genes control the most basic functions of bacterial life, they are difficult to study genetically because mutants lacking the functions die.  Here, Colin Manoil and colleagues develop a simple procedure for creating bacteria in which different essential genes have been completely deleted, making it possible to analyze the roles of the missing functions based on the features of the dead cells that result. 

Essential gene deletions producing gigantic bacteria

Image credit: Colin Manoil and colleagues

06/06/2019

Perspective

Reshaping membranes to build mitochondrial DNA

David Pla-Martin and Rudolf J. Wiesner discuss work by Silva Ramos et al, who demonstrate that rapid mtDNA synthesis in proliferating tissue-culture cells or cardiomyocytes during post-natal heart development requires mitochondrial fusion.

Reshaping membranes to build mitochondrial DNA

Image credit: Pla-Martin & Wiesner

05/23/2019

Perspective

Breaking the Y

Guilaume Holzer and Wolfram Antonin comment on work by Asakawa et al, who reveal asymmetrical localization of the homologous components of the human Nup107-160 subcomplex in fission yeast.

Breaking the Y

Image credit: Holzer & Antonin

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