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PLoS Computational Biology Issue Image | Vol. 14(7) July 2018

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OpenSim: open-source simulation software enables movement research from comparative biology to assistive robotics

Movement is fundamental to human and animal life, emerging through interaction of complex neural, muscular, and skeletal systems. OpenSim is open-source software that unites state-of-the-art models and methods from biology, neuroscience, mechanics, robotics, and computer science to create fast and accurate physics-based simulations of movement. OpenSim complements experiments by computing muscle forces and other quantities that are difficult to measure, and enables prediction of movements such as bipedal locomotion in human ancestors and neuromuscular adaptations to exoskeletons or orthopaedic surgeries. Seth et al.

Image Credit: Human model and simulation from Rajagopal et al. [1]; chimpanzee model from O'Neill et al. [2] and unpublished simulation results provided by M.C. O'Neill and B.R. Umberger.

1. Rajagopal A, Dembia CL, DeMers MS, Delp DD, Hicks JL, Delp SL. Full-body musculoskeletal model for muscle-driven simulation of human gait. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 2016; 63(10):2068-2079

2. O'Neill MC, Lee LF, Larson SG, Demes B, Stern JT Jr, Umberger BR. A three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) pelvis and hind limb. J Exp Biol. 2013; 216(19):3709-3723.

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OpenSim: open-source simulation software enables movement research from comparative biology to assistive robotics

Movement is fundamental to human and animal life, emerging through interaction of complex neural, muscular, and skeletal systems. OpenSim is open-source software that unites state-of-the-art models and methods from biology, neuroscience, mechanics, robotics, and computer science to create fast and accurate physics-based simulations of movement. OpenSim complements experiments by computing muscle forces and other quantities that are difficult to measure, and enables prediction of movements such as bipedal locomotion in human ancestors and neuromuscular adaptations to exoskeletons or orthopaedic surgeries. Seth et al.

Image Credit: Human model and simulation from Rajagopal et al. [1]; chimpanzee model from O'Neill et al. [2] and unpublished simulation results provided by M.C. O'Neill and B.R. Umberger.

1. Rajagopal A, Dembia CL, DeMers MS, Delp DD, Hicks JL, Delp SL. Full-body musculoskeletal model for muscle-driven simulation of human gait. IEEE Trans Biomed Eng. 2016; 63(10):2068-2079

2. O'Neill MC, Lee LF, Larson SG, Demes B, Stern JT Jr, Umberger BR. A three-dimensional musculoskeletal model of the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) pelvis and hind limb. J Exp Biol. 2013; 216(19):3709-3723.

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pcbi.v14.i07.g001