Advertisement
  • Loading metrics

PLoS Computational Biology Issue Image | Vol. 5(11) November 2009

PLoS Computational Biology Issue Image | Vol. 5(11) November 2009

PLOS
x

Motion computation on the fly.

This image shows a hoverfly, Eristalis tenax, face to face with a VLSI vision chip that mimics neurons involved in real-time motion processing. The fly is a superb model for biologically inspired vision, since many key image processing stages have been studied in depth physiologically. Computational models that take full account of the adaptive properties of fly vision provide robust and efficient processing of motion in natural scenes independent of their structure. Such models are well suited to VLSI implementation or other low-power approaches to real-time artificial image processing (see Brinkworth and O'Carroll, doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000555).

Image Credit: David C O'Carroll (The University of Adelaide)

thumbnail
Motion computation on the fly.

This image shows a hoverfly, Eristalis tenax, face to face with a VLSI vision chip that mimics neurons involved in real-time motion processing. The fly is a superb model for biologically inspired vision, since many key image processing stages have been studied in depth physiologically. Computational models that take full account of the adaptive properties of fly vision provide robust and efficient processing of motion in natural scenes independent of their structure. Such models are well suited to VLSI implementation or other low-power approaches to real-time artificial image processing (see Brinkworth and O'Carroll, doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000555).

Image Credit: David C O'Carroll (The University of Adelaide)

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pcbi.v05.i11.g001