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PLoS Biology Issue Image | Vol. 17(8) August 2019

PLoS Biology Issue Image | Vol. 17(8) August 2019

PLOS
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Remote reefs and seamounts are the last refuges for marine predators across the Indo-Pacific

Since the 1950s, industrial fisheries have expanded globally, as fishing vessels are required to travel further afield for fishing opportunities. Technological advancements and fishery subsidies have granted ever-increasing access to populations of sharks, tunas, billfishes, and other predators. Wilderness refuges, defined here as areas beyond the detectable range of human influence, are therefore increasingly rare. In order to achieve marine resources sustainability, large no-take marine protected areas with pelagic components are being implemented. However, such conservation efforts require knowledge of the critical habitats for predators, both across shallow reefs and the deeper ocean. This study by Letessier et al. aimed to fill this gap in knowledge across the Indo-Pacific by using 1,041 midwater baited videos to survey sharks and other pelagic predators such as rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata), mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), and black marlin (Istiompax indica). While human pressures had no influence on species richness, both body size and shark abundance responded strongly to distance to human markets, and refuges were identified at more than 1,250 km from human markets for body size and for shark abundance. These refuges were identified as remote and shallow seabed features, such as seamounts, submerged banks, and reefs. The image shows a blue shark (Prionace glauca) and a bait canister on a mid-water baited video.

Image Credit: Marine Futures Lab, University of Western Australia

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Remote reefs and seamounts are the last refuges for marine predators across the Indo-Pacific

Since the 1950s, industrial fisheries have expanded globally, as fishing vessels are required to travel further afield for fishing opportunities. Technological advancements and fishery subsidies have granted ever-increasing access to populations of sharks, tunas, billfishes, and other predators. Wilderness refuges, defined here as areas beyond the detectable range of human influence, are therefore increasingly rare. In order to achieve marine resources sustainability, large no-take marine protected areas with pelagic components are being implemented. However, such conservation efforts require knowledge of the critical habitats for predators, both across shallow reefs and the deeper ocean. This study by Letessier et al. aimed to fill this gap in knowledge across the Indo-Pacific by using 1,041 midwater baited videos to survey sharks and other pelagic predators such as rainbow runner (Elagatis bipinnulata), mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus), and black marlin (Istiompax indica). While human pressures had no influence on species richness, both body size and shark abundance responded strongly to distance to human markets, and refuges were identified at more than 1,250 km from human markets for body size and for shark abundance. These refuges were identified as remote and shallow seabed features, such as seamounts, submerged banks, and reefs. The image shows a blue shark (Prionace glauca) and a bait canister on a mid-water baited video.

Image Credit: Marine Futures Lab, University of Western Australia

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pbio.v17.i08.g001