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PLoS Biology Issue Image | Vol. 8(6) June 2010

PLoS Biology Issue Image | Vol. 8(6) June 2010

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Fractionated inflorescences of maize.

Just as the doubled genomes of maize have fractionated during evolution, so too have the inflorescences. Sorghum, like most members of the grass tribe Andropogoneae, combines male and female reproduction in a single inflorescence, while Zea mays possesses two specialized inflorescences—the tassel and ear—devoted to male and female reproduction respectively (see Woodhouse et al., e1000409).

Image Credit: Damon Lisch (University of California Berkeley)

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Fractionated inflorescences of maize.

Just as the doubled genomes of maize have fractionated during evolution, so too have the inflorescences. Sorghum, like most members of the grass tribe Andropogoneae, combines male and female reproduction in a single inflorescence, while Zea mays possesses two specialized inflorescences—the tassel and ear—devoted to male and female reproduction respectively (see Woodhouse et al., e1000409).

Image Credit: Damon Lisch (University of California Berkeley)

https://doi.org/10.1371/image.pbio.v08.i06.g001