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Probiotic Bacteria Induce a ‘Glow of Health’

Figure 6

Lactobacillus reuteri –induced benefits in hair quality require anti-inflammatory cytokine Interleukin-10.

In contrast to wild type animals, feeding of L reuteri to aged C57BL/6 mice lacking interleukin (Il)-10 failed to improve subcutaneous hair follicle or sebocyte profile. (A) Histomorphometrical analysis in Il-10-deficient mice reveals insignificant differences in hair follicle activity and distribution (anagen-phase versus telogen-phase). Numbers on the y-axis of bar graphs represent the mean±SEM of hair-follicles classified in each hair cycle stage. (B) Likewise, sebocyte counts were not significantly different among L. reuteri- and control water-fed Il-10-deficient mice. Numbers on the y-axis of bar graphs represent the mean±SEM of sebocyte counts per X20 high power field image. (C) Evaluation of mucocutaneous pH shows eating probiotics induces more alkaline conditions in skin, oral cavity, rectum and vaginal mucosa of Il-10-deficient mice, contrasted with the more acidic conditions in WT female mice (Fig. 1D). (D) Depletion of Il-17A using anti-cytokine antibodies recapitulates the probiotic-induced glow of health features in the skin including hair follicle anagen phase predominance and vastly increased numbers of sebocytes in sebaceous glands. Numbers on the y-axis of bar graphs represent the mean±SEM of hair-follicles classified in each hair cycle stage. Numbers on the y-axis of bar graphs represent the mean±SEM of sebocyte counts per X20 high power field image.

Figure 6

doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0053867.g006