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A Novel Human-Infection-Derived Bacterium Provides Insights into the Evolutionary Origins of Mutualistic Insect–Bacterial Symbioses

  • Adam L. Clayton ,

    aclayto@gmail.com

    Affiliation Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Kelly F. Oakeson,

    Affiliation Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Maria Gutin,

    Affiliation Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Arthur Pontes,

    Affiliation Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Diane M. Dunn,

    Affiliation Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Andrew C. von Niederhausern,

    Affiliation Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Robert B. Weiss,

    Affiliation Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Mark Fisher,

    Affiliations ARUP Institute for Clinical and Experimental Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America, Department of Pathology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

  • Colin Dale

    Affiliation Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States of America

A Novel Human-Infection-Derived Bacterium Provides Insights into the Evolutionary Origins of Mutualistic Insect–Bacterial Symbioses

  • Adam L. Clayton, 
  • Kelly F. Oakeson, 
  • Maria Gutin, 
  • Arthur Pontes, 
  • Diane M. Dunn, 
  • Andrew C. von Niederhausern, 
  • Robert B. Weiss, 
  • Mark Fisher, 
  • Colin Dale
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