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Evolution of Stress Response in the Face of Unreliable Environmental Signals

Figure 3

Invasion success of random switching strategies for various ecological settings.

Pairwise invasibility plots (PIPs) are shown for three different ecological settings: single patch (A–C), two patches with global density regulation (D–F), and two patches with local density regulation (G–I). To produce these plots, we fixed the value of responsive switching to and performed the pairwise invasion analysis with two strategies, and , characterized by two different values of random switching, and , respectively; the invading strategy was introduced at frequency of 1%, and if it increased in frequency after generations, invasion was considered successful. Left panels (A,D,G) show the invasion of strategy into the resident population of strategy , while middle panels (B,E,H) show the invasion of strategy into the resident population of strategy ; red color show successful invasion, while yellow color show unsuccessful invasion. Right panels (C,F,I) show the overlay of the left and middle panels. Two things can be noted. First, the singular strategy in two patches with global density regulation has a lower switching value than the other two. Second, in the case of two patches and local density regulation, some combinations of two strategies are mutually invasible. Parameters used are , , , , , , for and a semi-deterministic simulations (see Methods); results were averaged times, and a phenotype was counted as able to invade if it increased in frequency in more than 50% of the simulations.

Figure 3

doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002627.g003