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Family living sets the stage for cooperative breeding and ecological resilience in birds

Fig 1

Avian social systems.

Social systems include non-family-living species (55% in our data set, e.g., the blue tit Parus caeruleus [a]), in which parent–offspring associations do not extend beyond nutritional independence and individuals that do not engage in cooperative breeding; family-living species (31% in our data set, e.g., the Siberian jay Perisoreus infaustus [b]; see also S1 Fig), in which offspring remain with their parents beyond nutritional independence but do not aid in the rearing of future broods; and cooperative breeding species (13% in our data set, e.g., the apostlebird Struthidea cinerea [c]), in which offspring remain with their parents beyond nutritional independence and help them in subsequent breeding attempts or engage in redirected helping at nests of relatives. In a small number of species (1% in our data set), e.g., in the guira cuckoo Guira (d), cooperative breeding primarily involves nonrelatives (“non-kin cooperatively breeding species”). (a) Image credit: Per Harald Olsen/NTNU. (b) Image credit: Michael Griesser. (c) Image credit: Michael Griesser. (d) Image credit: Beatrice Murch.

Fig 1

doi: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.2000483.g001