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Pioneers or Settlers? A Prion Makes the Switch

November 14, 2017

Pioneers or Settlers? A Prion Makes the Switch

Gregory Newby and the late Susan Lindquist reveal that an epigenetic prion switch in yeast specializes the cells either into “pioneers” that readily disperse in water and disfavor inbreeding, or into “settlers” that have enhanced resilience and adhesion.

Image credit: pbio.2003476

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11/14/2017

research article

Making Economic Decisions

How does attention shape the way that we perceive value and make decisions? Habiba Azab and Benjamin Hayden show that neuronal encoding of offer value in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex partially depends on the upcoming decision; this dependence increases as offers are compared, reflecting the evolving economic decision.

Image credit: Flickr user: Images Money

Making Economic Decisions

Recently Published Articles

Current Issue

Current Issue October 2017

11/16/2017

essay

A Forgotten 1960s Experiment in Biological Preprints

In 1961, the NIH began a little-known experiment in biological preprints which was killed off by pressure from publishers in 1967. This article by Matthew Cobb reveals this hidden history and draws lessons.

Image credit: pbio.2003995

A Forgotten 1960s Experiment in Biological Preprints

11/16/2017

perspective

Gene Drive for Conservation: Use with Caution!

This Perspective article by Kevin Esvelt and Neil Gemmell highlights the promise and potential pitfalls of gene drive technologies in conservation, and the need for open, international, discussions concerning a technology that will have global ramifications.

Image credit: Maungatautari Ecological Island Trust

Gene Drive for Conservation: Use with Caution!

11/08/2017

research article

Compensation in the Aging Thymus

Aging-induced thymic atrophy results in a decline in the establishment of central T cell tolerance. Jiyoung Oh, Weikan Wang, Rachel Thomas and Dong-Ming Su show that this does not involve impairment of thymic regulatory T cells (tTregs); rather, more tTregs are made in an attempt to compensate for defects in thymocyte negative selection.

Compensation in the Aging Thymus

Image credit: Flickr user: NIAID

11/06/2017

research article

Stochasticity, Robustness, and Stem Cell Number

Dimitris Katsanos, Michalis Barkoulas and co-workers combine forward genetics, cell lineage tracing and single-molecule imaging to explore how phenotypic variability emerges in the normally stereotypical development pattern of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

Stochasticity, Robustness, and Stem Cell Number

Image credit: pbio.2002429

11/06/2017

research article

Glutamine, DNA Damage and Cancer

Examination of the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and DNA repair pathways, by Thai Tran, Mei Kong and colleagues, reveals novel insights into how glutamine deficiency promotes genomic instability and modulates the response to therapy in cancer.

Glutamine, DNA Damage and Cancer

Image credit: PubChem

11/09/2017

research matters

Neglected Diseases: Why Basic Research Matters

Peter Hotez argues that a global commitment to basic science approaches could revolutionize our approach to the control of neglected diseases.

Neglected Diseases: Why Basic Research Matters

Image credit: Maria Gobbo, Centre for Tropical Diseases, Verona

10/31/2017

short report

Crowd-Sourced Vocal Learning in Bat Pups

Experimental playback of manipulated calls induces vocal dialects in fruit bats, demonstrating their ability to learn vocalizations from the surrounding crowd in the cave.

Crowd-Sourced Vocal Learning in Bat Pups

Image credit: Eran Amichai

11/02/2017

research article

Holes in our Auditory Timescale

Sounds such as speech or music seem continuous, but surprisingly there are discretized time scales that are either preferred or avoided for processing temporally modulated sounds.

Holes in our Auditory Timescale

Image credit: pbio.2000812

11/01/2017

community page

Undergrads Uncover Protein–Protein Interactions

This undergrad research experience shows how the teaching lab can contribute to scientific advances while building student proficiency and preparedness for real-world challenges.

Undergrads Uncover Protein–Protein Interactions

Image credit: pbio.2003145

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